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CHAPTER V. On the Interpretation of the Figurative Language of

Scripture.

580

Section I. General Observations on the Interpretation of Tropes and

Figures.

581

Section II. On the Interpretation of the Metonymies occurring in the

Scriptures.

Nature of a Metonymy. - 1. Metonymy of the cause. — -2. Metonymy of the

effect. — 3. Metonymny of the subject. — 4. Metonymy of the adjunct, in which

the adjunct is put for the subject.

589

Section III. On the Interpretation of Scripture Metaphors.

Nature of a Metaphor. — Sources of Scripture Metaphors. -- 1. The works of

nature.- II. The occupations, customs, and arts of life. – III. Sacred topics,

or religion and things connected with it. — IV. Sacred history.

597

Section IV. On the Interpretation of Scripture Allegories.

The Allegory defined. - Different species of Allegory. — Rules for the interpre-

tation of Scripture Allegories.

604

Section V. On the Interpretation of Scripture Parables.

I. Nature of a Parable. — II. Antiquity of this mode of instruction. — III. Rales

for the interpretation of Parables. — IV. Parables, why used by Jesus Christ.

- V. Remarks on the distinguishing excellence of Christ's parables, compared

with the most celebrated fables of antiquity.

610

SECTION VI. On Scripture Proverbs.

I. Nature of Proverbs. — Prevalence of this mode of instruction.— II. Different

kinds of Proverbs. — III. The Proverbs occurring in the New Testament, how

to be interpreted.

623

Section VII. Concluding Observations on the Figurative Language

of Scripture.

I. Synecdoche. — II. Irony. – III. Hyperbole.

626

CHAPTER VI. On the Spiritual Interpretation of the Scriptures. 630

CHAPTER VII. On the Interpretation of the Scripture Prophecies.

Section I. General Rules for ascertaining the Sense of the Prophetic

Writings.

635

Section II. Observations on the Accomplishment of Prophecy in ge-

neral.

64:

B

INTRODUCTION

TO THE

CRITICAL STUDY AND KNOWLEDGE

OF

THE HOLY SCRIPTURES.

ON THE CRITICISM AND INTERPRETATION OF THE

SCRIPTURES.

PART I.

ON SCRIPTURE-CRITICISM.

CHAPTER I.

ON THE ORIGINAL LANGUAGES OF SCRIPTURE.

SECTION I.

ON THE HEBREW LANGUAGE.

1. Antiquity of the Hebrew Language ;-II. And of its characters.

- III. Of the Vowel Points. A KNOWLEDGE of the original languages of Scripture is of the utmost importance, and indeed absolutely necessary, to him who is desirous of ascertaining the genuine meaning of the Sacred Volume. Happily, the means for acquiring these languages are now so numerous and easy of access, that the student, who wishes to derive his knowledge of the Oracles of God from pure sources, can be at no loss for guides to direct him in this delightful pursuit.

1. The HEBREW LANGUAGE, in which the Old Testament is written, with the exception of a few words and passages that are in the Chaldæan dialect, is generally allowed to have derived its name

1 Besides sone Chaldee words occasionally inserted in the historical and pro phetical books, after the Israelites became acquainted with the Babylonians, the following passages of the Old Testament are written in the Chaldee dialect, viz. Jer. x. 11. Dan. ii. 4. to the end of chap. vii. and Ezra iv. 8. to vi. 19. and vii. 12. to 17,

1

VOL. II.

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