The National Stenographer, Volume 3

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Page 88 - True, I talk of dreams ; Which are the children of an idle brain, Begot of nothing but vain fantasy ; Which is as thin of substance as the air ; And more inconstant than the wind...
Page 88 - And dreams in their development have breath, And tears, and tortures, and the touch of joy ; They leave a weight upon our waking thoughts, They take a weight from off our waking toils, They do divide our being...
Page 478 - But have you ever rightly considered what the mere ability to read means? That it is the key which admits us to the whole world of thought and fancy and imagination?
Page 88 - He that hath found some fledged bird's nest may know, At first sight, if the bird be flown ; But what fair well or grove he sings in now, That is to him unknown. And yet, as angels in some brighter dreams Call to the soul, when man doth sleep ; So some strange thoughts transcend our wonted themes, And into glory peep.
Page 526 - Yet I doubt not through the ages one increasing purpose runs, And the thoughts of men are widened with the process of the suns.
Page 45 - And when thou prayest, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites are: for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen of men.
Page 88 - Disparts a dew-lipp'd rose. Above his head, Four lily stalks did their white honours wed To make a coronal ; and round him grew All tendrils green, of every bloom and hue, Together...
Page 88 - As this gone by : good night, good night ! Sweet sleep be with us, one and all ! And if upon its stillness fall The visions of a busy brain, Well have our pleasure o'er again, To warm the heart, to charm the sight, Gay dreams to all ! good night, good night ! Carolinay Lady Nairne.
Page 481 - One is sometimes asked by young people to recommend a course of reading. My advice would be that they should confine themselves to the supreme books in whatever literature, or still better to choose some one great author, and make themselves thoroughly familiar with him. For, as all roads lead to Rome, so do they likewise lead away from it, and you will find that, in order to understand perfectly and weigh exactly any vital piece of literature, you will be gradually and pleasantly persuaded to excursions...
Page v - A number of systems are taught, but that of Benn Pitman is more generally used than any other in this country, and may be called the "American System.

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