Page images
PDF
EPUB

PAGE

127

STURGES

Thoughts on the Residence of the Clergy. By JOHN STURGES, LL.D. . A PERSECUTING BISHOP

An Appeal to the Legislature and the Public, or the Legality of the

Eighty-seven Questions proposed by the Bishop of Peterborough. A
Speech delivered in the House of Lords by Herbert, Lord Bishop of
Peterborough. London : 1822.
The Wrongs of the Clergy. London : 1822.
Episcopal Innovation, or the Test of Modern Orthodoxy. London : 1820.
Official Correspondence between the Bishop of Peterborough and the

Rev. John Green. 1821
INDIAN MISSIONS-

On the Policy of Communicating the Knowledge of Christianity to the

Natives in India. By a LATE RESIDENT IN BENGAL. 1807.

Addresses and Letters upon the same subject CHARLES JAMES Fox

Characters of the late Charles James Fox. By PHILOPATRIS VARVI

130

144

CENSIS

170

176

193

208

ROSE's CRITICISM OF Fox's HISTORY

On the Historical Work of the Right Honourable Charles James For

By the Right Honourable GEORGE ROSE VINDICATION OF Fox's HISTORY

Vindication of Mr. Fox's History. By SAMUEL HEYWOOD THE POOR-LAWS

Method for rendering Income arising from Personal Property available

to the Poor-Laws. 1819.
Review of Report and Evidence relative to the Poor-Laws. By S. W.

NICOL. York.
Essay on modifying the Poor-Laws.

Considerations on the Poor-Laws. By John DAVISON
MANAGEMENT OF PRISONS--

On the Criminal Prisons of this Country. By GEORGE HOLFORD,

M.P. 1821. Gurney on Prisons.

Report of the Society for Bettering the Condition of Prisons . THE TREATMENT OF UNTRIED Prisoners

A Letter on Prison Labour. By JOHN HEADLAM. 1823.

Proposed Improvements of York Castle. 1823
DR. PARR-

Spital Sermon, preached at Christ Church upon Easter-Tuesday,
April 15, 1800. To which are added Notes, by SAMUEL PARR,
LL.D.

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

DR. RENNEL

Discourses on Various Subjects. By THOMAS RENNEL, D.D., Master

of the Temple. London JOHN BOWLES

Reflections at the Conclusion of the War : Being a Sequel to Reflections

on the Political and Moral State of Society at the Close of the Eighteenth Century. The Third Edition, with Additions. By JOHN

DR. LANGFORD-

Anniversary Sermon of the Royal Humane Society. By W. LANG-

FORD, D.D.

PUBLIC CHARACTERS-

Public Characters of 1801-1802

NARES-

A Thanksgiving for Plenty, and Warning against Avarice. A

Sermon. By the Reverend ROBERT NARES, Archdeacon of Stafford,

and Canon Residentiary of Lichfield. London.

LEWIS-

Alfonso, King of Castile. A Tragedy in Five Acts. By M. G. LEWIS

LETTRES SUR L'ANGLETERRE-

Lettres sur l'Angleterre. Par J. FIEVEE. 1802.

PERCIVAL-

An Account of the Island of Ceylon. By ROBERT PERCIVAL, Esq.,

of his Majesty's Nineteenth Regiment of Foot. London

WITTMAN-

Travels in Turkey, Asia Minor, and Syria, &c., and into Egypt. By

WILLIAM WITTMAN, M.D. London : 1803.

EDGEWORTH,

Essay on Irish Bulls. By RICHARD LOVEL EDGEWORTH and MARIA

EDGEWORTH. London : 1802

DR. WINTERBOTTOM-

An Account of Native Africans in the Neighbourhood of Sierra Leone.

To which is added, An Account of the present State of Aledicine

among them. By THOMAS WINTERBOTTOM, Physician to the Colony

of Sierra Leone

DE LA BROCQUIERE-

The Travels of Bertrandon de la Brocquiere, First Esquire-Carver to

Philip le Bon, Duke of Burgundy, during the Years 1432, 1433.

Translated from the French, by THOMAS JOHNES, Esq.

INGRAM-

Causes of the Increase of Methodism and Dissension. By ROBERT

ACKLAND INGRAM, B.D. .

REPLY TO A METHODIST'S STRICTURES,

Strictures on two Critiques in the Edinburgh Review, on the Subject of

Methodism and Missions, with Remarks on the Influence of Reviews,

in general, on Morals and Happiness. By JOHN STYLES. London:

1809

CELEBS IN SEARCH OF A WIFE-

Cælebs in Search of a Wife : comprehending Observations on Domestic

Habits and Manners, Religion, and Morals. London : 1809

THE MADRAS DIFFICULTIES,

Narrative of the Origin and Progress of the Dissensions at the Presi-

dency of Madras, founded on Original Papers and Correspondence.

London : 1810.

Account of the Origin and Progress of the late Discontents of the Army

on the Madras Establishment. London : 1810.

Statement of Facts delivered to the Right Honourable Lord Minto. By

327

.

BROUGHTON

Letters from a Mahratta Camp during the Year 1809. By THOMAS

DUER BROUGHTON. 1813

TUKE-

Description of the Retreat, an. Institution near York, for Insane

Persons of the Society of Friends. Containing an Account of its

Origin and Progress, the Modes of Treatment, and a Statement of

Cases. By SAMUEL TUKE. York : 1813 ·

GAME LAWS-

Three Letters on the Game Laws. London : 1818

BOWDICH-

Mission from Cape Coast Castle to Ashantee, with a Statistical Account

of that Kingdom, and Geographical Notices of other parts of the

Interior of Africa. By T. EDWARD BOWDICH, Esq., Conductor.

London : 1819

ANASTASIUS-

Anastasius; or, Memoirs of a Greek, written in the 18th century.

London

SPRING GUNS

The Shooter's Guide. By J. B. JOHNSON. 1819

BOTANY BAY

1. Letters to Earl Bathurst. By the Hon. H. GREY BENNET, M.P.

2. Report of the Commissioner of Inquiry into the State of the Colony

of New South Wales. Ordered by the House of Commons to be

printed, 19th June, 1822

AMERICA-

1. Travels Through Part of the United States and Canada, in 1818

and 1819. By JOHN M. DUNCAN. A.B. Glasgow : 1823.

2. Letters from North America, written during a Tour in the United

States and Canada. By ADAM HODGSON. London : 1824.

3. An Excursion through the United States and Canada, during the

Years 1822 3. By an English Gentleman. London : 1824

Moore's CAPTAIN ROCK-

Memoirs of Captain Rock, the Celebrated Irish Chieftain ; with some

Account of his Ancestors. London : 1824

WATERTON'S WANDERINGS-

Wanderings in South America, the North-West of the United States,

and the Antilles, in the Years 1812, 1816, 1820, and 1824 ; with ori.

ginal Instructions for the perfect Preservation of Birds, etc., for

Cabinets of Natural History. By CHARLES WATERTON, Esq.

London : 1825

GRANBY

Granby. A Novel in Three Volumes. London : 1826

I ETTERS ON THE CATHOLICS-

T.etters on the Subject of the Catholics, to my brother Abraham, who

lives in the Country. By PETER PLYMLEY

[graphic][merged small]

the

а

HE author and speaker, whose works, here reprinted, will retain a pleasant village of Woodford. June 3rd, 1771, was the date of his birth, and his life terminated on February 22nd, 1845. His father was an English gentleman, whose habits are described to have been eccentric; his mother was the daughter of a French emigrant ; and he was the second of their four sons. The liveliness of his disposition may not have been foreign to the intermixture of the gayer spirit which runs, generally, in Gallic blood, with the usually more sluggish English temperament. He showed early promise; went to Winchester, and became captain of that school ; was elected to a scholarship in New College, Oxford, and two years after, in 1792, took his degree of B.A. He also obtained a fellowship of £100 a-year, a fact of consequence to him, as he was by no means well off. His own predilections were for the law, but in obedience to his father's wishes he took orders, and secured a curacy at Nether-Avon, on Salisbury Plain. There he attracted the attention of a wealthy neighbour, Mr. Hicks Beach, M.P. for Cirencester, and became tutor to that gentleman's eldest son. He had previously acquired the French language in a tour through Normandy, and it had been his design to visit, with his pupil, a German University, but the distracted state of the Continent, owing to the French revolution, prevented this step. An abode in Edinburgh was substituted, and during a residence there of several years, Sydney Smith made many valuable and lasting friendships, and acquired some reputation as a preacher and humourist. In 1799, being then 28 years of age, he was married to Miss Pybus, an English lady, the daughter of a banker. At this period the Scottish metropolis could boast of no inconsiderable literary power, and the young clergyman became acquainted with Henry, afterwards Lord Brougham, Francis, afterwards Lord Jeffrey, Francis Horner and others, who subsequently acquired fame in science and

[ocr errors]

literature. At one of the meetings of these then comparatively unknown but talented young men, it was proposed to start a Review. “One day,” says the author of Peter Plymley's letters, “we happened to meet in the eighth or ninth story, or flat, in Buccleugh Place, the elevated residence of the then Mr. Jeffrey. I proposed that we should get up a review ; this was acceded to with acclamation. I was appointed editor, and remained long enough in Edinburgh to edit the first number of the Edinburgh Review.* It appeared in October, 1802, he having contributed no less than seven articles. Two years later, he took up his residence in London. For the next two years he remained without any preferment in the Church, but preached at the Foundling Hospital, and Berkeley and Fitzroy Chapels, gaining considerable success in these pulpits. He also, during the seasons of 1804, 1805, and 1806, delivered three courses of lectures on“ Belles Lettres,” and “Moral Philosophy," at the Royal Institution. These, like his sermons, brought large fashionable audiences around him, who praised his matter and his wit ; but in afterlife, whimsically alluding to his ignorance of the subjects he treated, he characterized these lectures as a species of “literary imposture.” All this time he was constantly writing for The Edinburgh, and at Holland House and other mansions, principally Whig, he was a frequent and a welcome guest, delighting everybody with his brilliant conversational powers and rich humour.

When his friends attained power in 1806, Lord Erskine presented him to the rectory of Foston-le-Clay, in Yorkshire, worth about £ 500 a-year, but for the first year or two of his incumbency he discharged his parish duties by means of a curate.

In 1807 appeared, anonymously, “Letters on the Subject of the Catholics, by Peter Plymley." These had an immense circulation at the time, and are very characteristic of the author, sound sense being everywhere noticeable amidst the irony and pleasantries with which they abound. His efforts in the cause of justice to Catholics, thus early commenced, were never relaxed until Catholic Emancipation was carried. Two volumes of sermons were published a couple of years afterwards, and he now removed to Heslington, a village near York, where he was permitted by his diocesan to reside for a few years, as he hoped to exchange Foston-le-Clay for some more desirable parish. Unable to succeed in this wish, he resolutely turned his thoughts towards Foston, the forlorn situation of which he set forth by stating that it was

twelve miles from a lemon." Here he constructed a parsonage which, for ugliness and comfort, had not its equal in the county. In 1814, he removed hither with his family, and remained there for fourteen years, counteracting what might have been to him, as one of the darlings of society, the tedium of exile, by literary work, preaching, lecturing, doctoring, gossipping, and ministering to his parishioners with a zeal which won him all their affections. Before his time, a long period had elapsed since the parishioners had listened to a resident incumbent in their parish church, and in reference to this absence he

a

* Lord Brougham denies the correctness of this account.

« PreviousContinue »