Paradise Lost: A Poem in Twelve Books

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James Kay, jun. & brother, 1836 - 312 pages
 

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Page v - OF Man's first disobedience, and the fruit Of that forbidden tree whose mortal taste Brought Death into the world and all our woe, With loss of Eden (till one greater Man Restore us and regain the blissful seat!), Sing, heavenly Muse, that on the secret top Of Oreb or of Sinai didst inspire That shepherd who first taught the chosen seed In the beginning how the heavens and earth Rose out of Chaos...
Page 51 - And wisdom at one entrance quite shut out. So much the rather thou, celestial Light, Shine inward, and the mind through all her powers Irradiate ; there plant eyes, all mist from thence Purge and disperse, that I may see and tell Of things invisible to mortal sight.
Page 89 - With charm of earliest birds; pleasant the sun, When first on this delightful land he spreads His orient beams, on herb, tree, fruit, and flower, Glistering with dew; fragrant the fertile earth After soft showers; and sweet the coming on Of grateful evening mild: then silent night, With this her solemn bird, and this fair moon, And these the gems of heaven, her starry train...
Page viii - What though the field be lost? All is not lost; the unconquerable will, And study of revenge, immortal hate, And courage never to submit or yield: And what is else not to be overcome?
Page 106 - Thy goodness beyond thought, and power divine. Speak, ye who best can tell, ye sons of light, Angels; for ye behold him, and with songs And choral symphonies, day without night, Circle his throne rejoicing; ye in Heaven, On earth join, all ye creatures, to extol Him first, him last, him midst, and without end. Fairest of stars, last in the train of night, If better thou belong not to the dawn. Sure pledge of day, that crown'st the smiling morn With thy bright circlet, praise him in thy sphere, While...
Page 4 - Princes, Potentates, Warriors, the Flower of Heaven — once yours ; now lost, If such astonishment as this can seize Eternal Spirits ! Or have ye chosen this place After the toil of battle to repose Your wearied virtue, for the ease you find 320 To slumber here, as in the vales of Heaven ? Or in this abject posture have ye sworn To...
Page 36 - Rocks, caves, lakes, fens, bogs, dens, and shades of death, A universe of death, which God by curse Created evil, for evil only good, Where all life dies, death lives, and nature breeds, Perverse, all monstrous, all prodigious things, Abominable, inutterable, and worse Than fables yet have feigned, or fear conceived, Gorgons and hydras, and chimeras dire.
Page 248 - Did I request thee, Maker, from my clay To mould me Man ? Did I solicit thee From darkness to promote me...
Page 106 - Rising or falling still advance his praise. His praise, ye Winds, that from four quarters blow, Breathe soft or loud ; and, wave your tops, ye Pines, With every plant, in sign of worship wave.
Page 44 - And time, and place, are lost; where eldest Night And Chaos, ancestors of Nature, hold Eternal anarchy, amidst the noise Of endless wars, and by confusion stand. For Hot, Cold, Moist, and Dry, four champions fierce, Strive here for mastery, and to battle bring Their embryon atoms...

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