Speech and Drama

Front Cover
SteinerBooks, 2007 M10 24 - 418 pages

19 lectures, Dornach, April 10, 1921 and September 5-23, 1924 (CW 282)

In this course, designed for students and professionals in the stage arts, Rudolf Steiner begins with a fundamental and spiritually-rooted appreciation of human speech and what actually takes place during human communication. Speech is a spiritual activity as well as an art form, lending itself to real interaction with both higher spiritual worlds and the human world of social conversation.

Steiner shows that speech is a powerful tool for any serious dramatist in conveying the reality of worlds, whether visible or invisible, to the individual souls in the audience.

This is an essential book for anyone involved in speech work, communication arts, and many kinds of therapies.

C O N T E N T S

Foreword by Marie Steiner
Note by Translator

PART ONE: THE FORMING OF SPEECH
1. The Forming of Speech Is an Art
2. The Six Revelations of Speech
3. Speech as Formed Gesture
4. How to Attain Style in Speech and Drama
5. The Secret of the Art of the Master ...
6. Sensitive Perception for Sound and Word ...
7. Some Practical Illustrations of the Forming of Speech

PART TWO: THE MOLDING AND SCULPTING OF SPEECH
8. The Molding and sculpting of Speech
9. Style in gesture
10. The Mystery Character of Dramatic Art
11. The Relation of Gesture and Mime to the Forming of Speech
12. The Artistic Quality in Drama
13. Study of the Text from Two Aspects
14. Stage Décor: Its Stylization in Color and Light

PART THREE: THE STAGE AND THE REST OF MANKIND
15. The Esoteric Aspect of the Actor's Vocation
16. The Work of the Stage from Its More Inward Aspect
17. Further Study of the Sounds of Speech
18. The Speech Sounds as a Revelation of the Form of Man
19. The Formative Activity of the World

This volume is a translation from German of Sprachgestaltung und Dramatische Kunst (GA 282).

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Contents

IV
23
V
43
VI
64
VII
81
VIII
104
IX
120
X
145
XI
173
XVI
256
XVII
291
XVIII
312
XIX
327
XX
329
XXI
346
XXII
364
XXIII
379

XII
175
XIII
198
XIV
227
XV
242
XXIV
393
XXV
411
XXVI
417
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Austrian-born Rudolf Steiner was a noted Goethe (see Vol. 2) scholar and private student of the occult who became involved with Theosophy in Germany in 1902, when he met Annie Besant (1847--1933), a devoted follower of Madame Helena P. Blavatsky (1831--1891). In 1912 he broke with the Theosophists because of what he regarded as their oriental bias and established a system of his own, which he called Anthroposophy (anthro meaning "man"; sophia sophia meaning "wisdom"), a "spiritual science" he hoped would restore humanism to a materialistic world. In 1923 he set up headquarters for the Society of Anthroposophy in New York City. Steiner believed that human beings had evolved to the point where material existence had obscured spiritual capacities and that Christ had come to reverse that trend and to inaugurate an age of spiritual reintegration. He advocated that education, art, agriculture, and science be based on spiritual principles and infused with the psychic powers he believed were latent in everyone. The world center of the Anhthroposophical Society today is in Dornach, Switzerland, in a building designed by Steiner. The nonproselytizing society is noted for its schools.

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