On Near Sight, Aged Sight, Impaired Vision, and the Means of Assisting Sight

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Churchill, 1853 - 320 pages
 

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Page 131 - CYRIACK, this three years' day these eyes, though clear, To outward view, of blemish or of spot, Bereft of light, their seeing have forgot; Nor to their idle orbs doth sight appear Of sun, or moon, or star, throughout the year, Or man, or woman. Yet I argue not Against Heaven's hand or will, nor bate a jot Of heart or hope, but still bear up and steer Right onward. What supports me, dost thou ask? The conscience...
Page 289 - was a man of the highest integrity ; my mother, an excellent woman, was particularly known throughout the neighbourhood for her charitable donations. My father destined me from a child for the pursuits of polite learning, which I prosecuted with such eagerness, that, after I was twelve years old, I rarely retired to bed from my lucubrations till midnight. This was the first thing which proved pernicious to my eyes, to the natural weakness of which were added frequent headachs.
Page 310 - A pimple forms on the eye-ball, and causes an itching pricking pain, as though needles were continually piercing it. The temporary loss of sight is occasioned by the impossibility of opening the eyelids for a single moment, the smallest ray of light being absolutely insupportable. The only relief is a poultice of snow, but as that melts away, the intolerable tortures return.
Page 296 - ... moment I have experienced, and that I acknowledge His mercy, and His paternal goodness towards me; that above all, in regard of this calamity, I acquiesce in His divine will, for it is He Himself who comforts and upholds my spirit being ever more mindful of what He shall bestow upon me than of what He shall deny me; last of all, that I would not exchange my own consciousness of what I have done for any act of theirs however well performed, or lose the recollection of it, which is always so...
Page 291 - I should seem to reject that aid which perhaps may be offered me by Heaven. It is now, I think, about ten years since I perceived my vision to grow weak and dull ; and at the same time I was troubled with pain in my kidneys and bowels, accompanied with flatulency. In the morning, if I began to read, as was my custom, my eyes instantly ached intensely, but were refreshed after a. little corporeal exercise. The candle which I looked at, seemed as it were encircled with a rainbow. Not long after the...
Page 122 - ... them as much as possible. Optical aid can only be extended to a certain point, and the steps to that point should be as slow and as numerous as possible. By exercising prudent precautions, persons may often attain great age, and yet never require the aid of glasses beyond a very moderate power ; others, on the contrary, who from ignorance frequently increase the power of their glasses, may run through the whole assortment, and leave themselves only the most inconvenient resources to fall back...
Page 71 - ... eye than you have been accustomed to do, and desire the aid of plenty of light ; and on looking at a near object, it becomes confused, and appears to have a kind of mist before it, and the letters of a book run one into another, or appear double, &c. ; and BY CANDLELIGHT you catch yourself holding a book &c. close behind the candle.
Page 291 - In the morning, if I began to read, as was my custom, my eyes instantly ached intensely, but were refreshed after a little corporeal exercise. The candle which I looked at, seemed as it were encircled with a rainbow. Not long after the sight in the left part of the left eye (which I lost some years before the other) became quite obscured ; and prevented me from discerning any object on that side. The sight in my other eye has now been gradually and sensibly vanishing away for about three years ;...
Page 295 - Methought that by a certain fatality of my birth, two destinies were set before me, on the one hand blindness, on the other duty that I must necessarily incur the loss of my eyes, or desert a sovereign duty.
Page 300 - This curious discovery was the result of the last telescopic observations of Galileo. Although his right eye had for some years lost its power, yet his general vision was sufficiently perfect to enable him to carry on his usual researches. In 1636, however, this affection of his eye became more serious ; and, in 1637, his left eye was attacked with the same disease. His medical friends at first supposed that cataracts were formed in the erystalline lens, and anticipated a cure from the operation...

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