The Library Magazine, Volume 3

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J. B. Alden, 1880
 

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Page 615 - But they understood not this saying, and it was hid from them, that they perceived it not : and they feared to ask him of that saying.
Page 588 - And when they saw him, they were amazed : and his mother said unto him, Son, why hast thou thus dealt with us? behold, thy father and I have sought thee sorrowing. And he said unto them, How is it that ye sought me? wist ye not that I must be about my Father's business?
Page 154 - And let those that play your clowns speak no more than is set down for them; for there be of them that will themselves laugh, to set on some quantity of barren spectators to laugh too, though in the mean time some necessary question of the play be then to be considered; that's villainous, and shows a most pitiful ambition in the fool that uses it.
Page 595 - For thou shalt be in league with the stones of the field : And the beasts of the field shall be at peace with thee.
Page 382 - And Solomon stood before the altar of the LORD in the presence of all the congregation of Israel, and spread forth his hands toward heaven: and he said, LORD God of Israel, there is no God like thee, in heaven above, or on earth beneath, who keepest covenant and mercy with thy servants that walk before thee with all their heart...
Page 516 - To secure for that parliament, under a federal arrangement, the right of legislating for and regulating all matters relating to the internal affairs of Ireland, and control over Irish resources and revenues, subject to the obligation of contributing our just proportion of the Imperial expenditure.
Page 624 - Pitch thy behaviour low, thy projects high ; So shalt thou humble and magnanimous be: Sink not in spirit ; who aimeth at the sky Shoots higher much than he that means a tree.
Page 588 - And it came to pass, that after three days they found him in the temple sitting in the midst of the doctors, both hearing them and asking them questions. And all that heard him were astonished at his understanding and answers.
Page 102 - For nature beats in perfect tune, And rounds with rhyme her every rune, Whether she work in land or sea, Or hide underground her alchemy. Thou canst not wave thy staff in air, Or dip thy paddle in the lake, But it carves the bow of beauty there, And the ripples in rhymes the oar forsake.
Page 793 - Maya's child! wake! slumber not again! We are the voices of the wandering wind: Wander thou, too, O Prince, thy rest to find; Leave love for love of lovers, for woe's sake Quit state for sorrow, and deliverance make.

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