The Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets: With Critical Observations on Their Works, Volume 3

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G. Walker, J. Akerman, E. Edwards, 1821

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Page 215 - Unblaru'd through life, lamented in thy end, These are thy honours ! not that here thy bust Is mix'd with heroes, or with kings thy dust ; But that the Worthy and the Good shall say, Striking their pensive bosoms Here lies GAY...
Page 156 - Age, and are now the friendships only of children. Very few can boast of hearts which they dare lay open to themselves, and of which, by whatever accident exposed, they do not shun a distinct and continued view; and certainly what we hide from ourselves, we do not show to our friends. There is, indeed, no transaction which offers stronger temptations to fallacy and sophistication than epistolary intercourse.
Page 170 - The style of Dryden is capricious and varied, that of Pope is cautious and uniform. Dryden obeys the motions of his own mind, Pope constrains his mind to his own rules of composition. Dryden is sometimes vehement and rapid ; Pope is always smooth, uniform, and gentle...
Page 134 - Who but must laugh if such a man there be ? Who would not weep if Atticus were he?
Page 169 - Dryden certainly wanted the diligence of Pope. In acquired knowledge, the superiority must be allowed to Dryden, whose education was more scholastic, and who, before he became an author, had been allowed more time for study, with better means of information. His mind has a larger range, and he collects his images and illustrations from a more extensive circumference of science. Dryden knew more of man in his general nature, and Pope in his local manners.
Page 344 - Thoughts, he has exhibited a very wide display of original poetry, variegated with deep reflections and striking allusions, a wilderness of thought, in which the fertility of fancy scatters flowers of every hue and of every odour. This is one of the few poems in which blank verse could not be changed for rhyme but with disadvantage.
Page 43 - I must have got something for you. Let me see, what should I have had ? A couple of lobsters ; ay, that would have done very well ; two shillings tarts, a shilling : but you will drink a glass of wine with me, though you supped so much before your usual time only to spare my pocket? 'No, we had rather talk with you than drink with you.
Page 370 - He knew every branch of history, both natural and civil : had read all the original historians of England, France, and Italy ; and was a great antiquarian. Criticism, metaphysics, morals, politics, made a principal part of his study ; voyages and travels of all sorts were his favourite amusements ; and he had a fine taste in painting, prints, architecture, and gardening.
Page 312 - Young enjoys the credit of what is called an " Extempore Epigram on Voltaire ;" who when he was in England, ridiculed, in the company of the jealous English poet, Milton's allegory of " Sin and Death" You are so witty, profligate, and thin, At once we think thee Milton, Death, and Sin.
Page 9 - And to urge another argument of a parallel nature ; if Christianity were once abolished, how could the freethinkers, the strong reasoners, and the men of profound learning be able to find another subject so calculated in all points whereon to display their abilities...

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