American Journal of Science and Arts, Volume 69

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J.D. & E.S. Dana, 1855

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Page 453 - Gift of the State of New York. 13034, 0. 5. Sixth annual report of the Regents of the University of the State of New York on the condition of the State Cabinet of Natural History, &o.
Page 160 - Couch also states, that the intelligent, but almost unknown, Dr. Berlandier, writes in his journal of the Commission of Limits, that at the hacienda of Venagas, there was (1827) a piece of iron that would make a cylinder one yard in length, with a diameter of ten inches. It was said to have been brought from the mountains near the hacienda. It presented no crystalline structure, and was quite ductile.
Page 439 - The plaiting of the hats is done on a block, which is placed upon the knees; it begins at the crown, and finishes at the brim. According to the quality of the hats, more or less time is occupied in their completion : the coarser ones may be finished in two or three days, the finest take as many months. The best times for plaiting are the morning hours and the rainy season, when the air is moist : in the middle of the day, and in dry clear weather, the straw is apt to break, which, when the hats are...
Page 439 - ... a single piece, and by their lightness and flexibility. They may be rolled up and put into the pocket without injury. In the rainy season they are apt to get black, but by washing them with soap and water, besmearing them with lime-juice or any other acid, and exposing them to the sun, their whiteness is easily restored. So little is known about these hats, that it may not be deemed out of place to insert here a notice of their manufacture. The ' straw' (paja), previous to plaiting, has to go...
Page 125 - As this particular structure does not appear to have been met with below the Lias, and occurs in that formation, it furnishes another argument in favor of the Jurassic age of all these rocks. Prof. Rogers added, that he had not found in the New Red Sandstone of the Connecticut Valley either the Posidonia or Cypris, although he had met with obscure markings which he was inclined to refer to the latter. He had however satisfied himself that one of the plants, from the vicinity of Greenfield, in Massachusetts,...
Page 141 - These axles could be placed in a small frame of wood bushed with brass. This small frame, when placed on a piece of smooth board, could be turned freely round by turning the piece of board on which it rested as long as the gyroscope was not revolving, friction being sufficient...
Page 146 - The experiments were made by enclosing pieces of beef in bottles containing one, or a mixture of two or more of the following gases chlorine, hydrogen, nitrogen, ammonia, carbonic acid, carbonic oxide, and binoxide of nitrogen. Of these, the last two only possessed the power of retarding putrefaction. Beef that had been in...
Page 170 - Indians upon the peninsula, and with whom it no doubt originated. It is not wonderful that a subject, the causes of which are so little comprehended by our natives, should be invested with an air of mystery, or that an error once propagated (in consequence of the long series of years required to bring about any considerable change,) could scarcely be eradicated. While the idea of...
Page 143 - December, 7 falls second half, 88 falls. Giving an average of 14'6 for each month. The most important thing to notice is the small number of aerolites registered for the months of December and January, and the comparatively large number for June and July. The former two showing but 16 instances of falls, the latter two 35, or more than double. Now, granting that these aerolites, or meteorolites, belong to the system of the asteroids, having orbits therefore whose mean distance is superior to...
Page 142 - ... as that of the whole earth. He next showed that the determination with which it did this was sufficient to control the entire weight of the instrument, though that amounted to several pounds ; for, taking the ring gyroscope from the side of the ring of which a small steel wire projected, ending in a hook, the wire...

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