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Following are printed some of the sta automatic couplers. Only 602 cars in tistics of railways in the United States for passenger service were without autothe year ending June 30, 1904, from matic couplers. With respect to freight summaries which will be included in equipment, it appears that most of the the Seventeenth Annual Statistical Re freight locomotives had train brakes and port of the Interstate Commerce Com automatic couplers. Of 1,692,194 cars mission:

in freight service on June 30, 1904, 1,The total single-track railway mileage 434,386 had train brakes, and 1,674,427 in the United States on June 30, 1904, automatic couplers. was 213,994.34 miles, having increased The number of persons on the pay 5,927.12 miles in the year ending on that rolls of the railways in the United States, date. This increase exceeds that of any as returned for June 30, 1904, was 1,296,previous year since 1890.

121, or 611 per 100 miles of line. These The aggregate length of railway mile

figures, when compared with correspondage, including tracks of all kinds, was ing ones for the year 1903, show a de297,073.34 miles, being classified as fol

crease of 16,416 in the number of emlows: Single track, 212,243.20 miles; ployes, or 28 per 100 miles of line. The second track, 15,824.04 miles; third

classification of employes includes entrack, 1,467.14 miles; fourth track, 1, ginemen, 52,451; firemen, 55,004; con046.50 miles, and yard track and sidings,

ductors, 39,645, and other trainmen, 66,492.46 miles. Thus it appears that

106,734. There were 46,262 switch tenthere was an increase of 13,251.82 miles ders, crossing tenders, and watchmen. in the aggregate length of all tracks, of

With regard to the four general divisions which 4,932.40 miles, or 37.22 per cent.,

of railway employment, it appears that were due to the extension of yard track general administration required the serand sidings.

vices of 48,746 employes; maintenance The number of railway corporations

of way and structures, 415,721 employes; included in the report was 2,104.

maintenance of equipment, 261,819 emThe length of mileage operated by re

ployes, and conducting transportation, ceivers on June 30, 1904, was 1,323.28

566,798 employes. This statement dismiles, showing an increase of 137.83 miles

regards a few employes of which no asas compared with the previous year.

signment was made. The number of roads in the hands of re The amount of wages and salaries paid ceivers was 28, and at the close of the to employes during the year ending June previous year 27, 6 roads having been 30, 1904, as reported, was $817,598,810. taken from the hands of receivers and 7

The par value of the amount of railhaving been placed in charge of the way capital outstanding on June 30, courts.

1904, was $13,213,124,679, which repOn June 30, 1904, there were in the

resents a capitalization of $64,265 per service of the railways 46,743 locomo

mile for the railways in the United States. tives, the increase being 2,872. As Of this capital $6,339,899,329 existed as classified, these locomotives were:

Pas

stock, of which $5,050,529,469 was comsenger, 11,252; freight, 27,029; switch mon and $1,289,369,860 preferred, and ing, 7,610.

There were also 852 not as the remaining part, $6,873,225,350 as signed to any class.

funded debt, which consisted of mortThe total number of cars of all classes gage bonds, $5,746,898,983; miscellanewas 1,798,561, this total having in

obligations, $723,114,986; income creased 45,172 during the vear.

ous

bonds, $229,876,687, and equipment sig:ment of this rolling stock was, to the trust obligations, $173,334,694. Curpassenger service, 39,752 cars; to the rent liabilities are not included in railfreight service, 1,692,194 cars; the re way capital for the reason that this class maining 66,615 cars being those em of indebtedness has to do with the operaployed directly by the railways in their tion rather than with the construction own service.

Cars used by the railways and equipment of a road. Current liathat were owned by private companies bilities for the year amounted to $881,and firms are not included in this state 628,720, or $4,288 per mile of line. ment.

Of the total capital stock outstanding The aggregate number of locomotives $2,696,472,010, or 42.53 per cent., paid and cars in the service of the railways no dividends. The amount of dividends was 1,845,304. Of this number 1,554, declared during the year was $221,941,772 were fitted with train brakes, indi 049, being equivalent to 6.09 per cent. cating an increase during the year of 92, on dividend-paying stock. 513, and 1,823,030 were fitted with auto The number of passengers reported as matic couplers, indicating an increase carried by the railways in the year endof 52,472. Practically all locomotives ing June 30, 1904, was 715,419,682, indiand cars in passenger service had train, cating an increase of 20,528,147 as combrakes, and of the 11,252 locomotives pared with the year ending June 30, in that service 11,113 were fitted with 1903. The passenger mileage, or the

The as

1

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number of passengers carried 1 mile, was 21,923,213,536.

The number of tons of freight reported as carried (including freight received from connecting roads and other carriers) was 1,309,899,165, which exceeds the tonnage of the previous year by 5,504,842 tons.

The average revenue per passenger per mile for the year mentioned was 2.006 cents, the average for the preceding year being the same.

The average revenue per ton per mile was 0.780 cent. This average for the preceding year was 0.763 cent. Earnings per train mile show an increase for passenger, but a decrease for freight trains.

The gross earnings of the railways in the United States from the operation of 212,243.20 miles of line were, for the year ending June 30, 1904, $1,975,174,091, being $74,327,184_greater than for the previous year.

Their operating penses were $1,338,896,253, or $81,357,401 more than in 1903. The following figures give gross earnings in detail, with the increase of the several items as compared with the previous year: Passenger revenue, $444,326,991-increase, $22,622,399; mail, $44,499,732 – increase, $2,790,336; express, $41,875,636 — increase, $3,543,672; other earnings from passenger service, $10,914,746 increase, $1,093,469; freight revenue, $1,379,002,693 increase, $40,982,667; other earnings from freight service, $4,568,282-increase, $101,257: other earnings from operation, including unclassified items, $49,986,011 - increase, $3,193,384. Gross earnings from operation per mile of line averaged $9,306, the corresponding average for the year 1903 being $48 less.

The operating expenses were assigned to the four general divisions of such expenses, as follows: Maintenance of way and structures, $261,280,454; maintenance of equipment, $267,184,739; conducting transportation, $758,238,681; general expenses, $51,579,196; undistributed, $613,183.

The income from operation, or the net earnings, of the railways amounted to $636,277,838. This item, when compared with the net earnings of the year 1903, shows a decrease of $7,030,217. Net earnings per mile for 1904 averaged $2,998; for 1903, $3,133, and for 1902, $3,048.

The casualties returned by the carriers in their annual reports to the Commission embrace casualties sustained by passengers, employes, trespassers, and other persons. These returns are not comparable with figures given in the quarterly accident bulletins that are based on monthly reports, which are mainly confined to casualties to passen

gers and to employes actually on duty on or about trains.

The total number of casualties to persons on the railways for the year ending June 30, 1904, was 94,201, of which 10,046 represented the number of persons killed and 84,155 the number injured. Casualties occurred among three general classes of railway employes, as follows: Trainmen, 2,114 killed and 29,275 injured; switch tenders, crossing tenders, and watchmen, 229 killed, 2,070 injured; other employes, 1,289 killed, 35,722 injured. The casualties to employes coupling and uncoupling cars

were: Employes killed, 307; injured, 4,019. The casualties connected with coupling and uncoupling cars are assigned as follows: Trainmen killed, 269; injured, 3,506; switch tenders, crossing tenders, and watchmen killed, 23; injured, 420; other employes killed, 15; injured, 93.

The casualties due to falling from trains, locomotives, or cars in motion were: Trainmen killed, 457; injured, 4,757; switch tenders, crossing tenders, and watchmen killed, 25; injured, 301; other employes killed, 75; injured, 570. The casualties due to jumping on or off trains, locomotives, or cars in motion were: Trainmen killed, 116; injured, 3,926; switch tenders, crossing tenders, and watchmen killed, 14; injured. 278; other employes killed, 61; injured, 506.

The casualties to the same three classes of employes in consequence of collisions and derailments were: Trainmen killed, 613; injured, 4,337; switch tenders, crossing tenders, and watchmen killed, 20; injured, 138; other employes killed, 90; injured, 854.

The number of passengers killed in the course of the year 1904 was 441, and the number injured 9,111. In the previous year 355 passengers were killed and 8,231 injured. There

262 passengers killed and 4,978 injured because of collisions and derailments. The total number of persons, other than employes and passengers killed, 5,973; injured, 7,977. These figures include the casualties to persons classed as trespassing, of whom 5,105 were killed and 5,194 were injured. The total number of casualties to persons other than employes from being struck by trains, locomotives, or cars, was 4,749 killed and 4,179 injured. The ratios of casualties indicate that 1 employe in every 357 was killed and 1 employe in every 19 was injured. With regard to trainmen—that is, enginemen, firemen, conductors, and other trainmen-it appears that 1 trainman was killed for every 120 employed and 1 was injured for every 9 employed.

In 1904, 1 passenger was killed for every 1,622,267 carried, and 1 injured

were

was

for every 78,523 carried. For 1903 the figures show that 1,957,441 passengers were carried for 1 killed, and 84,424 passengers were carried for 1 injured. For 1895, 1 passenger was killed for every 2,984,832 carried and 1 injured for every 213,651 carried. With respect to the number of miles traveled the figures for 1904 show that 49,712,502 passenger miles were accomplished for each passenger killed, and 2,406,236 passenger-miles for each passenger injured. For 1903 the figures were, 58,917,645 passengermiles for each passenger killed, and 2,541,096 passenger-miles for each passenger injured. The figures for 1895 show that 71,696,743 passenger-miles were accomplished for each passenger killed, and 5,131,977 passenger-miles for each passenger injured. The Largest Mail Order House in Our Line in the West

Wedding Invitations

Fountain Pens By Mail-Cash with Order. Samples sent on application. Write to-day. 100 VISITING CARDS with 0. 50 WEDDING INVITATIONS, by

. and leather case$1.00

100 for $5.00 $3.25 100 LADIES' VISITING CARDS, A. A. Waterman's SELF correct sizes, in either FILLING AUTOMATIC FOUN. Script or oid

TAIN PEN, unlimi. English......

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ted Guarantee, $2.00 PASS, BILL BOOKS AND POCKET BOOKS for Ladies and Gentlemen

Write for Illustrated Catalogue.

McLEAN PTG, CO. 111 N. 8th STREET, Stationers ST. LOUIS, MO.

The following Division Cards have been lost or stolen. If presented, please take up and forward to this office: CARD NO. WRITTEN FOR.

DIV. 8661 .C. H. Blaney

3 6508 .L. V. Burch

7 18120. .J. W. Geary

55 9312 .C. D. Simmons

87 8500 ...J. C. Nabors

105 17793. Z. T. Atkinson

105 14826. W. H. Dunlap

106 16868.

.H. A. Gleistein 113 8937. .O. Miller

131 7836. W. E. Sanders

138 4801 A. T. Scruggs

196 12704. R. B. Morris..

206 16803 R. H. Tharp

248 4331 d. E. Landon.

257 4454 Walter Royal

304 12819. T. H. Dudley.

367 18334. W. L. Cord...

384 3910.

O. S. Fulkerson. .386 1160. D. B. Corson

395 2315. D. Morrow

.428 2353.

E. B. Benware .428 14231. Wm. Sapp.

428 17839.

.L, W. Felden.... .355

CALLING CARDS

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If the address on the wrapper of your CONDUCTOR is not correct, fill out this coupon, and send it to Editor Railway Conductor.

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AT Be Sure and give Oid Address and Division Number and State.
m Changes Received after the 11th of any Month are Too Late for That Issue.

OBITUARY

ARMSTRONG--Brother B. A. Armstrong, Division 117, Minneapolis, Minn.
BROWN—Brother C. F. Brown, Division 121, Huron, S. D.
CHAMBERLAIN-Brother Frank Chamberlain, Division 325, Grand Junction, Colo.
COLLIGAN—Brother J. Colligan, Division 200, Bradford, Pa.
CRAWFORD-Brother S. D. Crawford, Division 205, Portsmouth, Va.
CURRY-Brother T. Curry, Division 59, Texarkana, Arkansas.
FISHER-Wife of Brother G. W. Fisher, Division 1, Chicago, Ill.
FRANKLIN-Father of Brother T. B. Franklin, Division 312, Weehawken, N. J.
FULLER-Father of F. C. Fuller, Division 312, Wehawken, N. J.
Galvin-Brother James Galvin, Division 100, Columbus, Ohio.
GORMAN—Brother J. E. Gorman, Division 150, Uticą, N. Y.
GRADY-Brother J. C. Grady, Division 159, City of Mexico.
GRAHAM-Brother C. Graham, Division 290, Paducah, Ky.
Hadsell-Brother O. L. Hadsell, Division 107, Cincinnati, Ohio.
HILTON—Brother George Hilton, Division 376, Ashley, Indiana.
Hughes—Brother J. P. Hughes, Division 57, Fort Worth, Texas.
HULICK-Brother J. S. Hulick, Division 169, Jersey City, N. J.
HUMMER-Brother W. A. Hummer, Division 37, Phillipsburg, N. J.
KENDALL-Brother J. B. Kendall, Division 207, Amory, Miss.
KIMMONS--Brother J. C. Kimmons, Division 3, St. Louis, Mo.
KIRKLAND-Brother J. H. Kirkland, Division 438, Eldon, Mo.
LITTLE-Brother E. J. Little, Division 26, Toledo Ohio.
LONG-Brother G. W. Long, Division 224, Wilmington, Del.
LUNDY-Brother J. G. Lundy, Division 293 Chicago, Ill.
MCDONALD-Brother S. W. McDonald, Division 350, Seattle, Wash.
Nepp-Brother J. B. Neff, Division 252, Leadville, Colo.
NEWBERRY-Brother W. C. Newberry, Division 245, Arkansas City, Kansas.
Norris-Brother P. H. Norris, Division 185, Selma, Ala.
ORTH-Brother W. W. Orth, Division 48, Detroit, Mich.
PICKENS—Wife of Brother J. O. Pickens, Division 57, Fort Worth, Texas.
RAMBO—Brother George G. Rambo, Division 98, Montgomery, Ala.
RAGAN-Brother Aaron Ragan, Division 3, St. Louis, Mo.
SAGER—Brother C. W. Sager, Division 100, Columbus, Ohio.
SAWIN-Brother P. D. Sawin, Division 1, Chicago, Ill.
SPRAGUB-Brother C. A. Sprague, Division 1, Chicago, Ill.
STUVER-Wife of Brother C. E. Stuver, Division 395, Salt Lake City, Utah.
Wells-Brother G. E. Wells, Division 201, McKees Rocks, Pa.
WILLIAMS-Brother D. M. Williams, Division 114, Pittsburg, Pa.
Woods-Brother E. C. Woods, Division 40, St. Paul, Minn.

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ORDER OF RAILWAY CONDUCTORS OF AMERICA. General Information Relative to the Mutual Benefit Department. Assessment No. 446 is for death of Chas. Graham, August 27, 1905. Reserve Fund Assessment No. 7,

September 1, 1905. Time for payment expires Oct. 31, 1905

See Article 27, Laws governing Mutual Benefit Department.
BENEFITS PAID FROM JULY 1, 1905, TO JULY 31, 1905, INCLUSIVE.
BEN.

CERT.
NO.
NAME.
DIV. NO. SERIES, FOR

AMT.

CAUSE. 3615 H. P. Salter

261 1783

Death $1000 Heart Failure 3616 Wm. H. Childers 262 6539

Death 3000 Dilatation of Heart 3617 T. F. McManus

180 4973

Death 2000 Accident 3618 Geo. Nickerson

193 11094

Dis.

2000 Loss of Leg 3619 J. H. Burns

61 2498

Death 1000 Congestion of Lungs 3620 H. I. Keller

402 1337

Death 1000 Accident 3621 Thos. P. Gallagher 359 5556

Death 2000 Accident 3622 A. Knepper

162 5340

Dis.

2000 Loss of Leg 3623 T. J. Johnson

100 10408

Death 2000 Accident 3624 J. B. Howe

129
167

Death 4000 Suicide 3625 R. E. Hoats

153 6674

Death

3000 R. R. Accident 3626 A. 0. Gordon

407
6653

Dis.

3000 Loss of Foot 3627 S. O. Heffner

416 10207

Death 1000 Accident 3628 J. E. Hitt

194 8245

Death 1000 Accident 3629 H. V. Swallow

122 7130

Death 2000 Accident 3630 Edw. Jones

2 2404

Death 1000 Cancer of Stomach 3631 A. T. Meek

314 4580

Death 3000 Exhaustion 3632 G. F. Payne

143 4046

Death 3000 Consumption 3633 Thos. Maleady

2 7410

Death 1000 Locomotor Ataxia 3634 Thos. H. Boldon 102 1624

Death 2000 Acute Nephritis 3635 Thos. McLeod

16 1078

Death 2000 Bronchitis 3636 J. T. Mills

175 6507

Death 1000 Pneumonia 3637 James Neary

439 10527

Death 1000 Accident 3638 F. W. Burns

207 7628

Death

1000 Bright's Disease 3639 W. D. Wilkinson 236 12265

Death 2000 Accident 3640 H. G. Heverly

435 1225

Death 2000 R. R. Accident 3641 J. W. Wilkinson

338 9526

Dis.

2000 Loss of Hand 3642 M. Corcoran

17 7795

Death 2000 Accident 3643 H. J. Compton

162 4953

Death 1000 R. R. Accident 3644 J. M. Carney

135 7471

Death 2000 Consumption 3645 W. J. Hill

271 9108

Death 2000 Paralysis 3646 C. B. Brown

89 5321

Death

3000 R. R. Accident 3647 R. R. Wetzel

229 2785

Death 1000 R. R. Accident 3648 Louis Swift

257 6347

Death 3000 Typhoid Fever 3649 J. W. Conley

201
500

Death 4000 Accident 3650 James Walsh

87 6138

Death 1000 Struck by Lightning 3651 G. W. McKnight 161 6062

Death 1000 Heart Trouble 3652 A. W. Martin

49 3519

Death

1000 Bright's Disease
3653
Fred Daines

6
11

Death 1000 Typhoid Fever 3654 W. H. Paul

28 5400

Death

2000 Bright's Disease 3655 Wm. M. McDermott 169 8324

Death 2000 Accident 3656 J. F. Jones

334 10036

Death 2000 Consumption 3657 F. Champlin

34
13

Death 1000 Pulmonary Hemorrhage 3658 Doc Tierney

89 3925

Death 2000 R. R. Accident 3659 W. R. Ramsauer 196 4997

Death 1000 Empyemia 3660 E. J. Powers

122
5336

Death 1000 Accident 3661 A. B. Shortley

371 7505

Death

2000 Stomach Trouble 3662 Edwin Wilson

381
519

Death 2000 Heart Disease
3663
J. H. Harper

134
77

Death

1000 Consumption 3664 H. A. Elkins

409 6180

Dis.

3000 Loss of Leg 3665 W. A. Burks

265 3971

Death 1000 Accident 3666 W. S. Pettit

38 4708

Death 2000 Typhoid Fever 3667 W. G. Spencer

82 3537

Death 3000 Heart Failure 3668 W. F. Earley

139
5263

Death 1000 Paralysis 3669 Horace Lamb

1 11958

Death 2000 Accident 3670 C. Maxwell

48 6563

Death 1000

Accident 3671 E. J. Tracy

6 3043

Death 1000 R. R. Accident 3672 E. A. Van Vlick

76 9451

Death 1000 Cancer of Stomach 3673 E. B. Lindsay

107 5184
B Death

2000 Heart Failure 3674 C. W. West

170 5611

A Death 1000 Paresis 3675 Wm. Curran

40 3523 B Death 2000 Anaemia

NUMBER OF MEMBERS ASSESSED.
Series A, 11,529; Series B, 12,829; Series C, 6,688; Series D, 421; Series E, 56. Amount of Assessments
No. 446, anu Reserve Fund No. 7. $118,430.

FINANCIAL STATEMENT.
Received on Mortuary Assessment to July 31, 1905.

.$7,771,848.15 Received on Reserve Fund Assessment to July 31, 1905

295,469.38 Received on Expense Assessment to July 31, 1905...

123,155.80 Received on Applications, etc., to July 31, 1905

112,506.53

$8,302,979.86 Total Amount of Benefits paid to July 31, 1905.

$7,642,567.04 Total Amount of Expenses paid to July 31, 1905

215,722.73 To the Credit of Mortuary Fund, July 3, 1905.

129,281.15 To the Credit of Reserve Fund, July 31, 1905

295,469.38 To the Credit of Expense Fund, July 31, 1905.

19,939.60

$8,302,979.86 EXPENSES PAID DURING JULY. Fees returned, $18.00; Sundry expense, $456.83; Postage. $551.38; Stationery and Printing. $354.37; Salary, $697.50; Salary Ins. Com., $600.00.

W. J. MAXWELL, Secretary.

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