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This department is intended to serve the same purpose among the wives, mothers, daughters and sisters of our members that the Fraternal Department serves among our members. The rules at head of Fraternal Department will also apply to this one.

Editor Railway Conductor:

Had I the descriptive genius of Scott, the poetic fancy of Byron and the eloquence of Bryan, I might attempt a description of our trip to and from Portland that would in some degree present to your minds a picture of its grandeur and beauty. To do justice to the subject of our entertainment while at Portland and along the route would be impossible from my pen. I wish to say, though my pen has not the power to portray it, I appreciate every word and act said and done for us; I wish that I might mention the courtesies shown us, but time and space forbid.

The brothers of Jackson Division 149 gave a delightful outing on July 20th, to which their families, our Auxiliary and all visiting conductors were invited. "Uncle Billy" (W. N.) Harris was the "architect" of arrangements, and with the able corps of assistants he had it goes without saying that the squirrel stew and barbecue, in fact everything served, was of the best.

We think the railway conductor is a mighty factor in this tremendous country of ours and when we think how many trains are run every day we cannot deny that railway conductors run about as many things as any other men on earth, and I might add, run from as few.

Our insurance is growing to be second to none; our membership is steadily increasing. Sisters, I hope those of you who are thinking of insuring will do so without delay. Avail yourselves of the opportunity to protect your loved ones while you may. "Now is the accepted time"; you may put it off too long, a day too late.

I am sorry Sister McCall misunderstood me in some of my remarks made at the open meeting at Portland. She misquoted me in the June issue of The CONDUCTOR when she said, “Sister Callahan suggested glue our bearts together with that cement made in Portland." This is what I said: "May all the hearts of this concourse of splendid women who come to forward our glorious cause, and all the hearts of the multitudes who shall come to the feast prepared in the name of Lewis and Clark, be cemented together with ‘Portland' cement, the finest brand on the market."

Our able correspondent keeps you well posted about Ideal Division 39.

MRS. PERRY C. CALLAHAN. Chairman Grand Executive Committee. Jackson, Tenn.

Editor Railway Conductor:

While our legal Lady of the Quill is summering in the coast breezes and skirmishing with the gay and festive Jersey mosquito that is said to enjoy an international reputation for stick-to-itiveness and push second to none, it seems only fitting that some one of the stay-at-homes should assume the interrupted duty of contributing our quota to the columns of The CONDUCTOR.

The convention at Portland is now a matter of history, but let us hope that the good accomplished may continue a present fact for many years. Since so many of its delegates and visitors had to pass through our town, quite a wavelet of enthusiasm reached us. It became our privilege to assist in the entertainment of the cultured Bos. tonian and the courteous Southerner, and we trust that both were as favorably impressed with we of the wild and woolly as we were with them. If there were those among them who hoped to obtain glimpses, in our ranks, of the "typical westerner," as portrayed by the lucid pen of the imaginative professional quill-pusher, there may have been a shadow of disappointment; yet we who live in the very heart of nature, as it were, as yet unmarred by the handiwork of man, must in time absorb of its naturalness and to that extent lose the cultivated, We may have unconsciously conveyed a refreshing hint, at least, of thc far-famed cowgirl who, like the aborigines of America, is fast disappearing under the everadvancing tread of civilization. From the western breezes were wafted faint echoes of heart burnings and heated temperatures, natural and inevitable results of the cultivation of personal ambitions that seem to lie dormant in every human breast.

"Eternal vigilance is the price of liberty" has been amply proven, and might it not serve as well for our watchword, less we become inflated with our own importance and desire for selfish advancement to the extent of trampling on the rights and legitimate ambitions of others. And over the wireless route came also impressions that conventions are becoming after all mere junketing trips for the fortunate few who as a reward of merit or as successful wire-pullers are enabled to enjoy. For we are convinced that as many go as a result of wire-pulling as are sent because of natural ability and service performed for the advancement of Divisions. Can it ever be hoped that very

suit of business for a person or combination of persons to refuse to render professional services for less than the value he or they place upon said services. A man has the right to value his own labor; the right of every man to refuse to work for, deal with or associate with any man or class of men, according as he sees fit, is fundamental. This doctrine is founded upon the fundamental right of every man to conduct his own business in his own way, subject only to the condition that he does not interfere with the legal rights of others, and in the right which one

man may exercise singly, many, after consultation, may agree jointly and make simultaneous declaration of their choice. This has been repeatedly held as to associations of workmen and associations of men in other occupations or professions must be governed by the same principle. (Commonwealth vs. Hunt, 4 Met., 111; Carew vs. Rutherford, 106 Mass; Mogul Steam

ship Co. vs. McGregor, App. Cases, 25.)

Under the agreement entered into by the members comprising the Medical Society, if any restrictions to a free pursuit of business resulted, it would merely operate as a restriction upon their own private business, and would not interfere with the rights of the public or any other individual not a member of the association, nor does it prevent competition by other physicians not members of said society.

You are, therefore, advised that in our opinion the agreement referred to does not come within the terms of the antitrust statute of this State. If agreements of the character named were inhibited, it would also include la bor unions which agree on the scale of wages, associations of farmers who agree to hold the fruits of their labor for a stipulated price, and would interfere and prevent the free exercise of other constitutional rights not subject to legislative control.

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-This department is intended to serve the same purpose among the wives, mothers, daughters and sisters of our members that the Fraternal Department serves among our members. The rules at head of Fraternal Department will also apply to this one.

Editor Railway Conductor:

Had I the descriptive genius of Scott, the poetic fancy of Byron and the eloquence of Bryan, I might attempt a description of our trip to and from Portland that would in some degree present to your minds a picture of its grandeur and beauty. To do justice to the subject of our entertainment while at Portland and along the route would be impossible from my pen. I wish to say, though my pen has not the power to portray it, I appreciate every word and act said and done for us; I wish that I might mention the courtesies shown us, but time and space forbid.

The brothers of Jackson Division 149 gave a delightful outing on July 20th, to which their families, our Auxiliary and all visiting conductors were invited. "Uncle Billy" (W. N.) Harris was the "architect" of arrangements, and with the able corps of assistants he had it goes without saying that the squirrel stew and barbecue, in fact everything served, was of the best.

We think the railway conductor is a mighty factor in this tremendous country of ours and when we think how many trains are run every day we cannot deny that railway conductors run about as many things as any other men on earth, and I might add, run from as few.

Our insurance is growing to be second to none; our membership is steadily increasing. Sisters, hope those of you who are thinking of insuring will do so without delay. Avail yourselves of the opportunity to protect your loved ones while you may. "Now is the accepted time"; you may put it off too long, a day too late.

I am sorry Sister McCall misunderstood me in some of my remarks made at the open meeting at Portland. She misquoted me in the June issue of The CONDUCTOR when she said, "Sister Callahan suggested glue our bearts together with that cement made in Portland." This is what I said: “May all the hearts of this concourse of splendid women who come to forward our glorious cause, and all the hearts of the multitudes who shall come to the feast prepared in the name of Lewis and Clark, be cemented together with 'Portland' cement, the finest brand on the market."

Our able correspondent keeps you well posted about Ideal Division 39.

MRS. Perry C. CALLAHAN. Chairman Grand Executive Committee. Jackson, Tenn.

Editor Railway Conductor:

While our legal Lady of the Quill is summering in the coast breezes and skirmishing with the gay and festive Jersey mosquito that is said to enjoy an international reputation for stick-to-itiveness and push second to none, it seems only fitting that

some

one of the stay-at-homes should assume the interrupted duty of contributing our quota to the columns of The CONDUCTOR.

The convention at Portland is now a matter of history, but let us hope that the good accomplished may continue a present fact for many years. Since so many of its delegates and visitors had to pass through our town, quite a wavelet of enthusiasm reached us. It became our privilege to assist in the entertainment of the cultured Bostonian and the courteous Southerner, and we trust that both were as favorably impressed with we of the wild and woolly as we were with them. If there were those among them who hoped to obtain glimpses, in our ranks of the "typical westerner,'' as portrayed by the lucid pen of the imaginative professional quill-pusher, there may have been a shadow of disappointment; yet we who live in the very heart of nature, as it were, as yet unmarred by the handiwork of man, must in time absorb of its naturalness and to that extent lose the cultivated, We may have unconsciously conveyed a refreshing hint, at least, of thc far-famed cowgirl who, like the aborigines of America, is fast disappearing under the everadvancing tread of civilization. From the western breezes were wafted faint echoes of heart burnings and heated temperatures, natural and inevitable results of the cultivation of personal ambitions that seem to lie dormant in every human breast.

“Eternal vigilance is the price of liberty" has been amply proven, and might it not serve as well for our watchword, less we become inflated with our own importance and desire for selfish advancement to the extent of trampling on the rights and legitimate ambitions of others. And over the wireless route came also impressions that conventions are becoming after all mere junketing trips for the fortunate few who as a reward of merit or as successful wire-pullers are enabled to enjoy. For we are convinced that as many go as a result of wire-pulling as are sent because of natural ability and service performed for the advancement of Divisions. Can it ever be hoped that very

material or lasting good may be accomplished by intellects that for personal gratification and shortlived popularity lend themselves to political chicanery for the accomplishment of their purposes? We think not; hence, the burden of all routine work falls to the minority, who with indomitable perseverance and push are continually struggling for the uplift and advancement of our Order. Would that when the duty of selecting delegates for the convention in Memphis two years hence devolves on us, each and every Division would carefully analyze its material on hand and select only those whose zeal and interest in behalf of the welfare of that Division proclaim them as worthy to become representatives. Only so may our conventions become notable for intelligence, conservatism, and lofty ideals, and so only may the junketing feature become a mere incident.

Division 148 has had a surfeit of picnics this season, and is, or at least should be, ready to resume routine work. A joint picnic, engineered by the ladies of the engineers, firemen, trainmen and conductors' Auxiliaries, was held at Cascade, a most comfortable and snug retreat in the mountains, where, if one chooses, one can hide away entirely in that deep but ever-speaking solitude, where all frivolity must give place to the sober thoughts and soul communion that nature unadorned inspires. Chit-chat, music, the song and the dance were the order of the day for those who find most of pleasure in things of the earth earthy, after the well-filled baskets had been relieved of their contents. These outings make happy breaks in the routine of our existence. How fortunate could they be of more frequent occurrence! Much credit is due the ladies who so successfully carried out the project and the Midland officials who made it possible. Another picnic of lesser magnitude, consisting of only our membership and guests, was a refreshing success. The entertainment of B. of R. T. Ladies by our Division and a number of home receptions make up the list of gayeties.

Now the hottest of the heated term is on, and we would fain seek the deepest shade successfully sought by the ever-invigorating mountain ozone, the supply of which has not yet been limited as a result of over-production, and lazily soak up all the comfort to which we are entitled without the necessity of even giving voice to our thoughts though they be never so good-and oh, the pity of it, that expression was ever given to some of the thoughts that reach us!

But for a volunteer substitute it begins to dawn on us that we are going to considerable length, and will abruptly retire with what grace we may. Colorado City, Colo.

"148."

and willing to say, "Not my will but thine, O Lord, be done."

I read with interest the letter in the last Con. DUCTOR from the Sister up at Two Harbors, and I want to say her description of that town is not one whit overdrawn. It was my good privilege to visit Duluth and Superior last month, and through the courtesy of the Booth steamship line, we enjoyed a trip on the steamer Easton to Two Harbors.. We were pleased to hear that the new Divisions in both Superior and Two Harbors are making rapid progress in the work, and that Two Harbors, the “baby” Division in the Northwest, is to establish a precedent by having the first staff. It was also my good privilege to attend a meeting of Flour City Division last Thursday, and when I first entered the hall I thought I had made a mistake, I saw so many new and strange faces, which shows a splendid record.

Como Division meets but once during July, August and September, but with socials, picnics, and impromptu meetings to consider some acts of charity, the time goes merrily on. Our meetings are always so interesting with such an excellent parliamentarian as our President.

Sister Moore's semi-annual circular was full of items of general interest to us all. Let us all put our shoulders to the wheel and not rest until our Order is, as she wishes it to be, the highest pinnacle of success.

Our sympathy goes out to Sister Curran in her hour of sorrow.

We were pleased to see the message in the ConDUCTOR from Sister Patten.

I want to thank the Sisters for the kindly action taken at the convention on memorial day service. I trust that each Division will see fit to observe one day in the year in memory of those who have gone before.

We were pleased to meet Sister Gruye of Enderlin, N. D., at the meeting in Minneapolis. We trust that ere long we may have a new Division of the L. A. at that place. MRS. J. C. McCall.

St. Paul, Minn.

Editor Railway Conductor:

As our correspondent will not let out the sunshine in her soul and write a letter for The Con. DUCTOR, I venture to take the liberty to write a few lines in order to let our Sister Divisions know Columbia Division 40 is alive and very much alive.

Not having been able to attend the Division in some time, I was surprised at the new faces which greeted me, and I think our President and her staff have been very busy so far this year. Last year on our directory there were sixty-three members; for this year it has seventy-three-and still there are more to follow.

In July we had our annual picnic, which was not a success financially, as a herd of Elks had invaded our city at that time. We think our Brothers, thinking they were like eagles, did not dare to leave their homes for fear those Elks would carry off their wives or children.

The Division will have a card party September twentieth at their rooms; hope all members will attend.

Editor Railway Conductor:

The raging of the elements in a recent storm made me think of that still greater battle going on in the hearts of all of God's subjects. We little know when the storm of life will break forth in all its dreadful fury, and oh! how careful and cautious we should be to see that the boat is safely anchored within the buoy and the rudder is secured in safety. Let us, Sisters, take this lesson home to our hearts, and when trouble does overtake us, let us be ready

maker needs a recreation in change of scene at least once a year.

Our membership hasincreased three helpful members in as many months for which we feel very glad. Each member bringing new ideas and enthusiasm is a great help in planning and executing the work of our Order.

Fidelity Division 158 sends warm-weather greetings to all.

MRS. WM. W. DRAKE. Chillicothe, Ill.

Some of our Sisters have lost loved ones since January.

Some of our Sisters, I rather think, do not read THE CONDUCTOR as much as they ought to, from a remark I heard a Sister make. Our Brothers should enourage their wives and children to read every edition, as it is a clean, instructive book. The article written by E. Sheasgreen in the May edition is grand. If the Sisters could hear my better-half and I discuss the letters and poems in The CONDUCTOR they might get interested.

I would like to shake hands with the Brother from Fort Worth, Texas. His letter on the old conductor is fine; we have some here in Buffalo.

I wish to ask if each Auxiliary has a correspond. ent; if so, where are they? I rather think they forget their obligation-two hundred and fifteen Divisions and only twenty letters! Sisters, do not forget your obligation.

And now I must intrude no longer.
Buffalo, N. Y.

MRS. H. A. BRADY.

our

Editor Railway Conductor:

The last two numbers of The CONDUCTOR have been especially interesting, and although I dislike very much to break the charm, a letter from Fidelity Division 158 is long overdue.

Our delegate, Sister Clendenen, returned from the convention bringing a fine report, which she presented at the following meeting. It showed her to be a conscientious worker, as many interesting side-trips were sacrificed that she might devote her time to our good. After the report we enjoyed a fine impromptu lunch, which was most refreshing. Another of

members, Sister Stakely, was fortunate enough to attend the convention, accompanying her husband, who represented Illinois Valley 222.

Our anniversary was duly celebrated by entertaining the children of the Division, and after counting them, both large and small, we found that more than thirty must be provided for. It was a most enjoyable affair. After a six o'clock dinner and a little romp, thc children gave a complete program, showing us the development of their many talents in music and elocution.

Our band has enjoyed several social meetings since the last writing, and our last tea was a great success in every way.

Two of the Sisters living in Streator did all the preliminary work of planning a very successful ball in April, which was attended by many from here. now have

two entertainments planned for making money, and all will work in harmony for their success.

We have many very faithful members, and one I think deserves special mention, as she left her home city on circus day and travelled forty miles to attend our last meeting. There are others who come quite an inconvenient distance to meet with us every two weeks. Our meetings have been regular all through the summer, instead of once a month as they were last year.

Some of us housekeepers have returned from our summer vacations much refreshed, and several of the Sisters are now away on the annual visit. Some, for various reasons, may not be able to get a way from home, but in my opinion the home

Editor Railway Conductor:

As this is only my second letter this year, I shall have to go back several months in order to chronicle all our pleasant happenings. First, our anni. versary, which we celebrated very modestly at the pleasant home of Sister Sawyer in Deering. The other halves of us were invited, and of course they "tumbled over each other" to accept the invitation.

June 6th we were invited by Sister Cleaves to help her celebrate her birthday at her home in the pretty old town of Gorham, which was one of the very best of the many good times we had.

June 20th we accepted the invitation of our kind Sisters Dolan and Leonard to spend the day with them in the Bodowin College town of Brunswick. The weather man paid no attention to our request for a pleasant day, but it takes more than a drizzle of rain to daunt the Emergency Club, especially if there are refreshments in sight, and on all three of these occasions we were abundantly refreshed.

Division meetings are suspended through July and August, and we are not having so much as a picnic. The mail today brought a notice of an invitation to our Division to join Mascot Division of Boston in a shore-dinner at Salem Willows on August 16th, and I hope we shall rally a goodly number at Union Station at 7:00 on that morning. In the meantime the rest of the world is rushing along the same as ever.

I wonder will the time ever come when nations calling themselves civilized will settle their differences otherwise than by wholesale murder. And I also wonder if the time will ever come when John D. Rockefeller will have got enough money. It seems to me that when a man gets so insanely greedy, he ought to be restrained like any other lunatic. We in America think ours is the greatest and best government on earth. Perhaps it is, but when one little bald-headed man is allowed to make millions of dollars by raising the price of oilwhich even the poorest people cannot do withoutit seems to me there is something wrong with the government. I read a great deal about that same bald-headed man giving of his millions to schools and missionary societies, but I have never yet read of his voluntarily giving his workmen a few cents a day more, so that they might buy a little more light.

The Czar rules Russia, and the trusts, quite as autocratically, rule America, and who but the goyernment can stop their extortion? When five or six men can control the price of nearly everything this country produces, and put the price up as. high as they please, so that even corned beef and cabbage are luxuries, I think it's time the government showed some of its wisdom and power

We

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