American Annals of the Deaf, Volume 72

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Executive Committee of the Convention of American Instructors of the Deaf, 1927
Beginning with Sept. 1955 issues, includes lists of doctors' dissertations and masters' theses on the education of the deaf.

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Page 435 - Had I a sword of keener steel That blue blade that the king's son bears, but this Blunt thing!" he snapt and flung it from his hand, And lowering crept away and left the field. Then came the king's son, wounded, sore bestead, And weaponless, and saw the broken sword, Hilt-buried in the dry and trodden sand, And ran and snatched it, and with battle-shout Lifted afresh he hewed his enemy down, And saved a great cause that heroic day.
Page 435 - This I beheld, or dreamed it in a dream: There spread a cloud of dust along* a plain; And underneath the cloud, or in it, raged A furious battle, and men yelled, and swords Shocked upon swords and shields. A prince's banner Wavered, then staggered backward, hemmed by foes. A craven hung along the battle's edge, And thought, ' ' Had I a sword of keener steel That blue blade that the king 's son bears, but this Blunt thing !" he snapt and flung it from his hand, And lowering crept away...
Page 126 - But give me, Lord, eyes to behold the truth; A seeing sense that knows the eternal right; A heart with pity filled, and gentlest ruth; A manly faith that makes all darkness light: Give me the power to labor for mankind; Make me the mouth of such as cannot speak ; Eyes let me be to groping men and blind; A conscience to the base; and to the weak Let me' be hands and feet; and to the foolish, mind; And lead still further on such as thy kingdom seek.
Page 435 - THIS I beheld, or dreamed it in a dream: There spread a cloud of dust along a plain ; And underneath the cloud, or in it, raged A furious battle, and men yelled, and swords Shocked upon swords and shields. A prince's banner Wavered, then staggered backward, hemmed by foes. A craven hung along the battle's edge, And thought, ' Had I a sword of keener steel That blue blade that the king's son bears, but this Blunt thing ! ' he snapt and flung it from his hand, And lowering crept away...
Page 35 - Alphabet method, and, so far as circumstances permit, such method is chosen for each pupil as seems best adapted for his individual case. Speech and speechreading are taught where the measure of success seems likely to justify the labor expended, and in most of the schools some of the pupils are taught wholly or chiefly by the Oral method or by the Auricular method.
Page 35 - METHODS OF INSTRUCTION IN AMERICAN SCHOOLS FOR THE DEAF The "Methods of Instruction" named in the following Tabular Statement may be defined as follows: I. The Manual Method. Signs, the manual alphabet, and writing are the chief means used in the instruction of the pupils, and the principal objects aimed at are mental development and facility in the comprehension and use of written language. The degree of relative importance given to these three means varies in different schools; but is a difference...
Page 35 - Speech and speech-reading are regarded as very important, but mental development and the acquisition of language are regarded as still more important. It is believed that in some cases mental development and the acquisition of language can be best promoted by the Manual or the Manual Alphabet method and, so far as circumstances permit, such method is chosen for each pupil as seems best adapted for his individual case. Speech and speech-reading are taught where the measure of success seems likely...
Page 35 - There is a difference in different schools in the extent to which the use of natural signs is allowed in the early part of the course, and also...
Page 35 - IV. THE AURICULAR METHOD. The hearing of semi-deaf pupils is utilized and developed to the greatest possible extent, and with or without the aid of artificial appliances, their education is carried on chiefly through the use of speech and hearing, together with writing. The aim of the method is to graduate its pupils as hardof-hearing speaking people, instead of deaf-mutes. V. THE COMBINED SYSTEM. Speech and speechreading are regarded as very important, but mental development and the acquisition...
Page 389 - ... the other hand, in measuring the ability to follow printed directions, Pintner and Paterson3 found children becoming deaf later in life showing better comprehension of language and ability to respond correctly. After the giving of the Trabue Language Completion test* the conclusion was reached that children who lost their hearing before the age of four or five derived very little benefit from having once heard, when it is a question of understanding and using language. Those children becoming...

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