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PUBLISHED AND SOLD BY WM. ALEXANDER ;

SOLD ALSO BY
DARTON, HARVEY, AND Co., WM. PHILLIPS, AND

W. DARTON, JUN., LONDON.

1817

HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY

GIFT OF
HAVEPFORD COLLEGE LIBRARY

FEB 12 1935

Printed by HARGROVE, GAWTHORP, & COBB,

Herald-Office, York

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INTRODUCTION.

W hen those we loved and looked up to in life are taken from us, whatever belonged to them becomes enhanced in its value. When their Christian example is withdrawn, to the circumstances of their conscientious lives we often thoughtfully return :---when we can no longer listen to their cheering conversation, to their affectionate sayings we tenderly recur; and when we hear no more their religious exhortations, to the written records of their devout minds we are glad to have recourse, as precious monų. ments of departed piety.

· These observations, which will no doubt accord with many minds, will apply with propriety to JANE Pearson, the subject of this short memoir. In her last letter to the writer, she expressed a desire that he might look over her Papers when she was gone, and dispose of them as he thought best. The use he is now about to make of them, if he is not mistaken, the Reader will approve. These memo. randums of her pious mind, were all in her own hand-writing, and appear to have been penned under lively impressions. Among her Papers were also found several copies of verses; and as it will

probably be acceptable to the Reader, a specimen or 'two will be given in the memoir.

Of her religious experience, an opinion may be formed from her writings; and of her religious services, from the testimony of Pardshaw Monthly Meeting, which is introduced at the close of her own memoirs; yet some Readers may be inclined to know more of. her general character, and how she appeared daily amongst us.

As a reverence for the Divine Being was the leading feature of her mind, so the solemnity of religion was never lowered in her conversation. To some she might appear reserved; for as she has told me, when in her walks she met with acquaintances, she could not, like many, stop and hold a discourse with them which meant nothing. From these and other circumstances, her deportment might sometimes appear distant and restrained; but in the circles of her friends, there were few that unbended more freely. On such occasions, her sentiments, and even the tone of her voice, had as much the hearty expresa sion of sincere good-will, as any one I ever met with: whilst her innocent cheerfulness with youth, and her entering most kindly with them, into their little concerns, endeared her to this class both like a mother and a chosen companion. She was, howa ever, qualified for a companion in the foremost ranks of virtuous society; yet to those in the humblest sphere she spoke with attention and kindness: in« deed I have rarely met with one in whose deporta ment were united such dignity and sweetness..

She seemed to retire from a thoughtless world, to live in sweet seclusion with her Maker; yet those who were set forward on their heaven-ward jour, ney, she hailed as fellow-travellers towards Zion: to her sisters in religious fellowship, who went forth in humility and simplicity, to advocate the cause of righteousness amongst men, she held out the language of endearing encouragement.

Of her own ministry it might be said, that it was plain, powerful, baptizing, and new. When I say new, I hope none will suppose I mean that she had

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