A Grammar of the English Tongue, Spoken and Written: For Self-teaching and for Schools

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J. Weale, 1859 - 152 pages
 

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Page 146 - It blesseth him that gives, and him that takes: 'Tis mightiest in the mightiest: it becomes The throned monarch better than his crown...
Page 140 - The spinsters and the knitters in the sun, And the free maids that weave their thread with bones, Do use to chant it ; it is silly sooth, And dallies with the innocence of love, Like the old age.
Page 139 - As the apple tree among the trees of the wood, so is my beloved among the sons. I sat down under his shadow with great delight, and his fruit was sweet to my taste.
Page 140 - Come away, come away, death, And in sad cypress let me be laid ; Fly away, fly away, breath ; I am slain by a fair cruel maid. My shroud of white, stuck all with yew, O, prepare it; My part of death no one so true Did share it.
Page 150 - Man, like the generous vine, supported lives ; The strength he gains is from th' embrace he gives. On their own axis as the planets run, Yet make at once their circle round the sun ; So two consistent motions act the soul, And one regards itself, and one the whole.
Page 133 - How lov'd, how honour'd once, avails thee not, To whom related, or by whom begot ; A heap of dust alone remains of thee, 'Tis all thou art, and all the proud shall be ! Poets themselves must fall, like those they sung, Deaf the prais'd ear, and mute the tuneful tongue.
Page 142 - The isles of Greece, the isles of Greece! Where burning Sappho loved and sung, Where grew the arts of war and peace, Where Delos rose, and Phoebus sprung! Eternal summer gilds them yet, But all, except their sun, is set.
Page 12 - A Series of Volumes containing the principal Greek and Latin Authors, accompanied by Explanatory Notes in English, principally selected from the best and most recent German Commentators, and comprising all those Works that are essential for the Scholar and the Pupil, and applicable for the Universities of Oxford, Cambridge, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Aberdeen, and Dublin, the Colleges at Belfast, Cork, Galway, Winchester, and Eton, and the great Schools at Harrow, Rugby, &c. also for Private Tuition...
Page 151 - fair light, And thou enlighten'd earth, so fresh and gay, Ye hills, and dales, ye rivers, woods, and plains, And ye that live and move, fair creatures, tell, Tell, if ye saw, how came I thus, how here?
Page 135 - The only point where human bliss stands still, And tastes the good without the fall to ill ; Where only merit...

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