New Monthly Magazine, and Universal Register, Volume 11

Front Cover
Thomas Campbell, Samuel Carter Hall, Edward Bulwer Lytton Baron Lytton, William Harrison Ainsworth, Theodore Edward Hook, William Ainsworth, Thomas Hood
E. W. Allen, 1824

From inside the book

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 512 - But love, first learned in a lady's eyes, Lives not alone immured in the brain, But with the motion of all elements Courses as swift as thought in every power, And gives to every power a double power Above their functions and their offices.
Page 512 - Subtle as Sphinx; as sweet and musical As bright Apollo's lute, strung with his hair; And when Love speaks, the voice of all the gods Make heaven drowsy with the harmony.
Page 51 - All the penal laws of that unparalleled code of oppression, which were made after the last event, were manifestly the effects of national hatred and scorn towards a conquered people ; whom the victors delighted to trample upon, and were not at all afraid to provoke.
Page 511 - O ! they have lived long on the alms-basket of words. I marvel thy master hath not eaten thee for a word ; for thou art not so long by the head as honorificabilitudinitatibus: thou art easier swallowed than a flap-dragon.
Page 512 - From women's eyes this doctrine I derive : They sparkle still the right Promethean fire; They are the books, the arts, the academes, That show, contain, and nourish all the world...
Page 510 - Save base authority from others' books. These earthly godfathers of heaven's lights, That give a name to every fixed star, Have no more profit of their shining nights, Than those that walk, and wot not what they are.
Page 410 - River *, that rollest by the ancient walls, Where dwells the lady of my love, when she Walks by thy brink, and there perchance recalls A faint and fleeting memory of me ; " What if thy deep and ample stream should be A mirror of my heart...
Page 342 - To subvert the tyranny of our execrable Government, to break the connection with England, the never-failing source of all our political evils, and to assert the independence of my country these were my objects. To unite the whole people of Ireland, to abolish the memory of all past dissensions, and to substitute the common name of Irishman in place of the denominations of Protestant, Catholic, and Dissenter these were my means.
Page 442 - One topic remains my removal of restrictions from the press, has been mentioned in laudatory language. I might easily have adopted that procedure without any length of cautious consideration, from my habit of regarding the freedom of publication as a natural right of my fellow-subjects, to be narrowed only by special and urgent cause assigned.
Page 522 - Thence what the lofty grave tragedians taught In Chorus or Iambic, teachers best Of moral prudence, with delight received In brief sententious precepts, while they treat Of fate, and chance, and change in human life; High actions, and high passions best describing. Thence to the famous orators repair, Those ancient, whose resistless eloquence Wielded at will that fierce democratic, Shook the Arsenal and fulmined over Greece, To Macedon, and Artaxerxes...

Bibliographic information