Saint Louis: the Future Great City of the World: Illustrated with a Map

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order of the St. Louis County Court, 1870 - 106 pages
 

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Page 108 - Thou, too, sail on, O Ship of State! Sail on, O UNION strong and great! Humanity with all its fears, With all the hopes of future years, Is hanging breathless on thy fate. We know what master laid thy keel; What workmen wrought thy ribs of steel; Who made each mast and sail and rope; What anvils rang, what hammers beat; In what a forge and what a heat Were shaped the anchors of thy hope.
Page 13 - Yet I doubt not through the ages one increasing purpose runs, And the thoughts of men are widened with the process of the suns.
Page 89 - It looks likely to me: for if we can remove the turbulent Gallicks, our people, according to the exactest computations, will in another century become more numerous than England itself. Should this be the case, since we have, I may say, all the naval stores of the nation in our hands, it will be easy to obtain the mastery of the seas; and then the united force of all Europe will not be able to subdue us.
Page 107 - I have another and a far brighter vision before my gaze. It may be but a vision, but I will cherish it. I see one vast confederation stretching from the frozen North in unbroken line to the glowing South, and from the wild billows of the Atlantic westward to the calmer waters of the Pacific main, and I see one people, and one language, and one law, and one faith, and, over all that wide continent, the home of freedom, and a refuge for the oppressed of every race and of every clime.
Page 108 - Tis of the wave and not the rock; 'Tis but the flapping of the sail, And not a rent made by the gale ! In spite of rock and tempest's roar, In spite of false lights on the shore. Sail on, nor fear to breast the sea! Our hearts, our hopes, are all with thee.
Page 107 - Great God ! we thank thee for this home This bounteous birth-land of the free ; Where wanderers from afar may come, And breathe the air of Liberty. Still may her flowers untrampled spring, Her harvests wave her cities rise ; And yet till Time shall fold his wing, Remain earth's loveliest Paradise ! 229 I'AND OF OUR BIRTH.
Page 23 - The river navigation of the Great West is the most wonderful on the globe, and since the application of steam power to the propulsion of vessels, possesses the essential qualities of open navigation. Speed, distance, cheapness, magnitude of cargoes, are all there, and without the perils of the sea from storms and enemies. The steamboat is the ship of the river, and finds in the Mississippi and its tributaries the amplest theatre for the diffusion and the display of its power.
Page 89 - When we shall be full on this side," he writes, "we may lay off a range of states on the western bank from the head to the mouth, and so range after range, advancing compactly as we multiply.
Page 29 - ... as a popular error by distinguished writers on political economy. Mr. Hume, in his essay on commerce, maintains that the only way in which foreign commerce tends to enrich a country, is by its presenting tempting articles of luxury, and thereby stimulating the industry of those in whom a desire to purchase is thus excited the augmented industry of the nation being the only gain. Dr. Chalmers says : "Foreign trade is not the creator of any economic interest ; it is but the officiating minister...
Page 77 - There are several beds of purple shades in the coal measures which possess the properties requisite for paints used in outside work. Yellow and red ochres are found in considerable quantities on the Missouri River. Some of these paints have been thoroughly tested and found fire-proof and durable. SPRINGS AND WATER POWER. No State is, perhaps, better supplied with cold springs of pure water than Missouri. Out of the bottoms there...

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