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the instrumentality of J. Colby and C. H. Dan. forth*--two of God's faithful servants, peculiarly dear to myself; there I made a second appointment to preach, (as it is usually termed) and spake with a good degree of enlargement, to the satisfactivn, I believe, of all that heard. At the same place, I had the pleasure of seeing a WORK commence shortly after, and many souls "brought to ihe knowledge of the truth as it is in Jesus."

I was now greatly encouraged to hope, that if faithful to God, my labors would be crowned with abundant success, where ever I might go.

I went in the next place to a village called Blackstone, and spoke in a steeple-house, to some hundreds, with a tolerable degree of freedom. I visited a female minister of the Society of Friends, (M. Batty,) and was invited to speak with her, on a funeral occasion, which I did, I believe to her surprise I then went to Pawtucket, and took for a companion in travels, Martha Spalding, t (of the F. Baptist order) who thought herself called to the work of the Ministry.

We travelied for some weeks together in Gloucester, Foster, Killingly,(Con.) Scituate, Johnston and Smithfield, in these places, saverally, we had access to M. houses of different communities, and spake to large auditories, alternately, every day. I sometimes felt, in delivering my message to the people, like one, possessed of great authority, and its effects appeared visible on all that heard; then again, I labored under sad streightenings of spirit, for which I was not able to account; but I wished always to leave the event with God, and to press on to things more glorious ahead! even to the mark for the prize of the kingdom and the crown.

* Now Clarissa II. Richmond, still living in Connecticut.

She still continues to labor in the Vineyard of the Lord.

At Smithfield, for the first time, I attended a Methodist Camp-Meeting, and there, I had the pleasure of seeing, two other females, who had recently begun to exercise, in the ministry of the word, viz: Mrs. Thompson,t and Susan Humes. The experience of the latter, as I had it, at that time, from her own mouth, was not a little remarkable. In justice to her extraordinary character, and to the praise of God's amazing grace, which shone so conspicuously in her, I would here give my candid reader, a brief sketch of her history.

She was born in the State of Connecticut. At the age of 12, (if my recollection serves me) her parents died, and she was left to the care of an uncle; at the age of 17 she embraced religion, and on which account she was disowned of her guardian and all her friends: but to use her own language, “When all men forsook me,the Lord took

> and bade me go into a wide world, and publish His holy word. She continued accordingly, to testify the goodness of the Lord to her, from the period of her conversion, until the age of 19—when her labors were increased, and the field opened wider and wider, even without any effort of her own. A short time prior, to this our interview, as she said, “I visited the town of Providence, (R.I) and appointed to preach at

me up,

+Mrs. T. is still a preacher in connection with the Methodists. the Court-House of that place, but as the Court was sitting at the time, the house was found not sufficient, to convene the people, hence the Presbyterians opened their place of worship, and the concourse removed there:” and continued she, moreover,"Many judges and mighty men, I knew to be present; but One, over-head, I realized, was greater than them all, to inspect my language.”

I confess, that upon the Camp Ground, where I was favored with this interview with her, the ardent solicitude she manifested for the good of souls, and her melting addresses, to both saints and sinners, exceeded what I had ever witnessed before, in either male or female. I judge, that an effect similar, it must have produced on all that heard, which I acknowledge, it did upon myself, viz: to penetrate my heart with a very deep sense of my own unfaithfulness and indifference in the same blessed cause which I had likewise espoused.-(But as I shall have occasion to take up her history elsewhere, I will here leave the same, to be concluded in its proper place.)

I felt myself, at this time, especially called away from the vain formularies and the customary devotions to which many of the different communities extant, adhered: and as a being, accountable for my doings alone to the LORD JESUs Christ; to try, to listen to the voice of His spirit, in my own soul, as the only infallible guide, and to shape my own line of conduct, as much as possible, in conformity thereto. Towards the close of October, I took my

leave of Martha for a space; and in company with J. W. and his wife, I reached again my father's house in peace:--Mrs. W. being then in the last stage of a consumption, and on the way to her father's, to die there:-she hence insisted on my proceeding with them 100 miles still farther. Having felt a concern, sometimes to visit the churches of the eastern country--more especially for my own instruction in righteousness--I therefore conceived it my duty to go on:-and to endeavor to improve the opportunity, in doing all the good, (in the use of all means) which might lie in my power.

As I was about departing again with many tears, my dear brother Philip handed me a very affectionate letter; (that he had written, to send to me, in Rhode Island;) wherein he highly applauded the choice I had made of devoting my life, without reserve, to the service of the blessed Redeemer; and with regard to himself, he added, "I am not a stranger, altogether, to the sentiments which religion inspires." "The duties of my station, call me oftentimes to the abodes of wretchedness and woe; where I behold my fellow-beings, wracked with the most excruciating bodily pains; and their souls tortured with the forebodings of an awful retribution to come! I hence have learned, in some measure, how to sympathize with the distressed and forlorn:-and to view my own peculiar mercies, in such a light, as it behoveth me to do.He concluded, moreover, by saying, "I hope to meet you in a coming day, where no inhabitant shall endure disease or pain,--and we shall part no more.

That my brother should write to me in such a strain, was matter of no small surprise; and which,

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the Court-House of that place, but as the Court was sitting at the time, the house was found not sufficient, to convene the people, hence the Presbyterians opened their place of worship, and the concourse removed there:” and continued she, moreover,“Many judges and mighty men, I knew to be present; but One, over-head, I realized, was greater than them all, to inspect my language.

I confess, that upon the Camp Ground, where I was favored with this interview with her, the dent solicitude she manifested for the good of souls, and her melting addresses, to both saints and sinners, exceeded what I had ever witnessed before, in either male or female. I judge, that an effect similar, it must have produced on all that heard, which I acknowledge, it did upon myself, viz: to penetrate my heart with a very deep sense of my own unfaithfulness and indifference in the same blessed cause which I had likewise espoused.(But as I shall have occasion to take

up

her history elsewhere, I will here leave the same, to be concluded in its proper place.)

I felt myself, at this time, especially called away from the vain formularies and the customary devotions to which many of the different communities extant, adhered: and as a being, accountable for my doings alone to the LORD Jesus Christ; to try, to listen to the voice of His spirit, in my own soul, as the only infallible guide, and to shape my own line of conduct, as much as possible, in conformity thereto.

Towards the close of October, I took my leave of Martha for a space; and in company with J. W. and his wife, I reached again my father's

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