A practical treatise on breeding, rearing, and fattening, all kinds of domestic poultry. By Bonington Moubray

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Page 273 - Obedience : for so work the honey bees, Creatures that by a rule in nature teach The art of order to a peopled kingdom : They have a king, and officers of sorts ; Where some, like magistrates, correct at home, Others, like merchants, venture trade abroad...
Page 273 - Where some, like magistrates correct at home, Others, like merchants, venture trade abroad, Others, like soldiers, armed in. their stings, Make boot upon the summer's velvet buds, Which pillage they with merry march bring home To the tent-royal of their emperor...
Page 197 - Such articles are too washy and diuretic, and can never be worth attention, whilst the more solid and nutritious productions of the field may be obtained in such plenty, and will return so much greater profit. Rabbits may, indeed, be kept, and even fattened upon roots, good green meat, and hay ; but they will pay for corn ; and this may be taken as a general rule : Rabbits which have as much corn as they will eat, can never take any harm from being indulged with almost an equal portion of good...
Page 246 - Aldemey cows yield rich milk upon less food than larger stock, but are seldom large milkers, and are particularly scanty of produce in the winter season. They are, besides, worth little or nothing as barreners, not only on account of their small size, but their inaptitude to take on fat, and the ordinary quality of their beef.
Page 168 - ... immense are the quantities which may be raised. The first step towards PIGEON KEEPING, is, undoubtedly, to provide a commodious place for their reception, of which I shall afterwards speak ; the next, to provide the pigeons themselves. These will be had in pairs, but if not actually MATCHED, pains must be afterwards taken, to that end, that no time be lost ; indeed, they may be matched according to the fancy of the keepers, for the purpose of varying the colours, or with any other view.
Page 109 - ... that is, they are not willing to come to be shut up in the basket : those that are intended to be turned out wild, should be taught to perch, (a situation they have never been used to ;) this is done by tying a string to the hen's leg, and obliging her to sit in a tree all night ; be sure you put her in the tree before sun-set ; and if she falls down, you must persevere in putting her up again till she is contented with her situation ; then the young birds will follow the hen and perch with her....
Page 194 - Like chickens, the best breeding rabbits are those kindled in March. Some days before parturition, or kindling, hay is to be given to the doe, to assist in making her bed, with the flue, which nature has instructed her to tear from her body for that purpose. She will be at this period seen sitting upon her haunches, and tearing off the flue, and the hay being presented to her, she will, with her teeth, reduce and shorten it to her purpose. Biting down of the litter or bed, is the first sign of...
Page x - Countries. in any other part of the world, poultry has ever been deemed a luxury, and consequently not reared in such considerable quantities as in France, Egypt, and some other countries, where it is used more as a necessary article of food, than as a delicacy for the sick, or a luxury for the table. In France...
Page 2 - They make their nests upon the ground, only just scraping a hole in the earth, and sometimes lining it With a little long grass or straw. There they lay two eggs only, almost of the size of a goose egg, of a pale olive brown, marked with spots of a darker colour. They hatch for about five weeks, and the young ones run about as soon as they are out of the shell.
Page 158 - Pigeons often fly to a great distance for their food, and when they can find corn to eat seldom prey upon any thing else. They begin to eat corn about the middle of July, and rarely want the same food...

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