The Works of Joseph Addison: The Spectator

Front Cover
G.P. Putnam & Company, 1854
 

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Contents

Success of the Spectators with various Classes of Read ers represented by the Club
96
False Wit and HumourGenealogy of Humour
100
Catalogue of a Ladys LibraryCharacter of Leonora
104
English TragedyLeeOtway
109
Tragedy and TragiComedy
114
English TragedyMethods to aggrandize the Persons in Tragedy
119
Stage Tricks to excite PityDramatic Murders
123
Consequences of the Peace French FashionsChild ish Impertinence
129
The Spectators Paper of Hints droppedGospelgossip Ogling 138 47 Theory of the Passion of Laughter
137
Remarks on the English by the Indian Kings
142
Effects of Avarice and Luxury on Employments
149
Vision of Marraton
153
Mischiefs of PartyRage in the Female Sex
158
Essay on WitHistory of False Wit
162
The same subject continued
167
Wit of the Monkish Agesin Modern Times
172
The Subject continued
177
Difference between True and False WitMixt Wit
181
Allegory of several Schemes of Wit
188
On Friendship
194
Commerce
198
Critique on the Ballad of ChevyChase
203
Account of the Everlasting Club
210
Passion for Fame and PraiseCharacter of the Idols
214
Continuation of the Critique on ChevyChase
218
Female PartySpirit discovered by Patches
225
Dream of a Picture Gallery
230
Fate of WritingsBallad of the Children in the Wood
235
On Physiognomy 89 LoversDemurrageFolly of Demurrage 90 Punishment of a voluptuous Man after DeathAdven ture of M Pontigna
249
Books for a Ladys Library
253
Proper Methods of employing Time
257
Subject continuedPursuit of Knowledge
262
Ladies Headdresses
267
The Chief Point of Honour in Men and WomenDuel ling
271
IN FIVE VOLUMES
275
Exercise of the Fan
279
Will Honeycombs Knowledge of the Worldvarious Kinds of Pedants
283
Spectators visit to Sir R de Coverleys Country Seat the Knights domestic Establishment
287
Character of Will Wimble
291
On Ghosts and Apparitions
295
Use and Difficulties of Periodical Papers
340
Mischiefs of Party Spirit
344
The Subject continuedSir Rogers Principles
350
Letter on the Hooppetticoat 128 Difference of Temper in the SexesFemale Levity
358
Fashions in DressHow imitated in the Country
362
Interview of the Spectator and Sir Roger with a Gang of Gypsies
366
Opinions entertained of the Spectator in the Country Letter from Will Honeycomb
369
Blessing of Being born an EnglishmanThe English Tongue
372
On great natural Geniuses
383
On Inconstancy and Irresolution
388
Consolation
393
Story of Theodosius and Constantia
396
Introduction of French Phrases in the History of the WarSpecimen in a Letter
403
Durability of WritingAnecdote of an atheistical Au thor
409
On Goodnature as the Effect of Constitution
411
On Jealousy 171 Subject continuedAddress to those who have jealous Husbands
420
Account of a Grinningmatch 177 Goodnature as a Moral Virtue
431
Various Dispositions of ReadersAccount of a Whist lingmatchYawning
436
Cruelty of Parents in the Affair of Marriage
441
On FableFable of Pleasure and Pain
446
THE SPECTATOR Continued 184 Account of a remarkable Sleeper
451
Zealvarious kinds of Zealots
454
On Infidelity
458
Cruelty of ParentsLetter from a father to his Son Duty to Parents
462
On the Whims of LotteryAdventurers
466
On Temperance 198 Character of the SalamandersStory of a Castilian and his Wife
480
On Seducers and their illicit ProgenyLetter from a natural Son
482
Notions of the Heathen on Devotion 209 Simonidess Satire on Women
499
Transmigration of SoulsLetters on Simonidess Satire on Women
504
On habitual good Intentions
509
Educationcompared to Sculpture
513
QualityVanity of Honours and Titles
517
Account of Sappho
526
Discretion and Cunning
530
Letter on the Lovers Leap
534
Fragment of Sappho 639
539
Reflections on Modesty
543
IIistory of the Lovers Leap 648
548
Account of the Trunkmaker in the Theatre 652
560
Letter on the Absence of LoversRemedies proposed 243 On the Beauty and Loveliness of Virtue
568

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Page 82 - When I look upon the tombs of the great, every emotion of envy dies in me ; when I read the epitaphs of the beautiful, every inordinate desire goes out; when I meet with the grief of parents upon a tomb-stone, my heart melts with compassion ; when I see the tomb of the parents themselves, I consider the vanity of grieving for those whom we must quickly follow...
Page 1 - I HAVE observed, that a reader seldom peruses a book with pleasure, till he knows whether the writer of it be a black or a fair man, of a mild or choleric disposition, married or a bachelor, with other particulars of the like nature, that conduce very much to the right understanding of an author.
Page 287 - ROGER'S family, because it consists of sober and staid persons; for as the knight is the best master in the world, he seldom changes his servants; and as he is beloved by all about him, his servants never care for leaving him. By this means his domestics are all in years, and grown old with their master. You would take his valet...
Page 382 - These are the mansions of good men after death, who, according to the degree and kinds of virtue in which they excelled, are distributed among these several islands, which abound with pleasures of different kinds and degrees suitable to the relishes and perfections of those who are settled in them; every island is a paradise accommodated to its respective inhabitants.
Page 204 - I never heard the old song of Percy and Douglas that I found not my heart more moved than with a trumpet; and yet it is sung by some blind crowder with no rougher voice than rude style, which being so evil apparelled in the dust and cobweb of that uncivil age, what would it work trimmed in the gorgeous eloquence of Pindar?
Page 379 - Genius smiled upon me with a look of compassion and affability that familiarized him to my imagination, and at once dispelled all the fears and apprehensions with which I approached him. He lifted me from the ground, and taking me by the hand, 'Mirza,' said he, 'I have heard thee in thy soliloquies; follow me.
Page 301 - But can we believe a thinking being, that is in a perpetual progress of improvements, and travelling on from perfection to perfection, after having just looked abroad into the works of its Creator, and made a few discoveries of his infinite goodness, wisdom, and power, must perish at her first setting out, and in the very beginning of her inquiries ?1 A man, considered in his present state, seems only sent into the world to propagate his kind.
Page 6 - Cocoa-tree, and in the theatres both of Drury-lane and the Haymarket. I have been taken for a merchant upon the Exchange for above these ten years, and sometimes pass for a Jew in the assembly of stockjobbers at Jonathan's.
Page 7 - I never espoused any party with violence, and am resolved to observe an exact neutrality between the Whigs and Tories, unless I shall be forced to declare myself by the hostilities of either side. In short, I have acted in all the parts of my life as a looker-on, which is the character I intend to preserve in this paper.
Page 7 - Thus I live in the world rather as a spectator of mankind than as one of the species...

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