Harrison's British Classicks, Volume 7

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Harrison and Company, 1786
 

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Page 162 - that there are many people in the world who would never have been in love if they had never heard talk of it.
Page 203 - I find you are but a bad engineer. While you aim at your mouth you will never hit it, take my word for it. A floating battery, to hit the mark, must be pointed something above or below it. If you would hit your mouth, direct your four-pounder at your forehead, or your chin.
Page 77 - Now sir, I have told you as much as I know of it, though I have admired and aimed at it all my Life.
Page 77 - Your daughters muft have been fo educated as to fit them to be wives without conjugal affedlion, and mothers without maternal care.
Page 40 - I can allure you, fir, that it is a very ferious one to me, notwithftanding the ill-natured comfort which I might have, of thinking it of late a very common one. I AM a gentleman of a reafonable paternal eftate in my county, and ferve as knight of the fhire for it.
Page 364 - I sat like a mope all the night, not daring to look up, for fear of catching the eyes of my acquaintance, who would have laughed me out of countenance. You may imagine, Mr. Fitz-Adam, that I contrived all manner of means to get off from any future engagements with my cousins ; but it has unfortunately so happened, that we have met almost every where.
Page 363 - I cannot but hope it will have some good effect on the conduct of those polite people, who are too sagacious, learned, and courageous to be kept in awe by the threats of hell and damnation...
Page 37 - I never faw either of them fo much as playing with the other's hand — I mean only when they have known I was within fight of them ; I have ftolen upon them unawares indeed, and have been witnefs to fuch words and looks as have quite melted me.
Page 20 - ... by the benefit than he had been before by his wants. But it is the peculiar talent of this gentleman to wound himfelf by proxy, or (in the fportfman's phrafe) to' knock himfelf down by by the recoiling of his own gun.
Page 39 - Such horfes have their necks adorned <c with firings of beads, and relicks, being writings " wrapt up in cloth of gold, or filk, containing the " names of their prophet, and when thefe horfes die, " they are buried with as much ceremony, as the near• " eft relations of their owners.

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