Page images
PDF
EPUB

by appnhenSac neariof, declared by a imneM. Fa* am what

tease thecotxfitka of o» jwstiicatn. 1j_i,<,nk* nf Ihn tum iln ■ i In

be learned Ijj

CHAP. IV.

Tbe proper Hw of these words jirstificatien, mj to jwitrfy, considered. Ne-

cessity thereof. L,tin derivation of gratification. Some of the ancients de-

ceivedbyit. From 'jus," and 'jostnni;' pastes nuns,' who. Tbe Hebrew

p-im. Ute and signification of *. Places where it it used, examined.

S Sam. xr. 4. Dent. SI. 5. Pror. xvH. »5. Isa. v. S3. L 8. 1 Kings vii. 31,

3*. S Cbron. vi SS, S3. PsaL liixii. 3. Exod. nio. 7. Isa. En. 11. Jer. xBv.

16. Dan. xH. 3. Tbe constant sense of the word, erinced. Asuuw, ase of

it in other aathors, to punish. What it U in the New Testament, Mau. ii.

19. A 57. Lnke vii. S9. x- S9. xvi 15. xvfii. 14. Acts xin. 38,39. Rom.

ii. 13. iii- 4. Constant! v used in a forensic sense. Places seeming dab*ms,

vindicated. Rom. viH. 30. 1 Cor. vi. 11. Th. iii. 5—7. Rev. xxii. 11.

How often these words ttmuim and ja—fay are used in the New Testa-

ment. Constant sense of this. The same erinced, from what is opposed

unto it, Isa. t. 8. Pror. xvii. 15. Rom. T. 16.»8. viH. 33,34. And the de-

claration of it in terms equivalent. Rom. ir. 6, 7. T. 9, 10. 4 Cor. v. SO,

21. Mau. i. SI. Acts xiii. 39. Gal. ii. »6, &c. Justification in the Scripture,

proposed under a juridical scheme, and of a forensic title. Tbe parts and

progress of it. Instances from the whole 153

CHAP. V.

Distinction of a first and second justification. The whole doctrine of the Ro-
man church concerning justification grounded on this distinction. The first
justification, the nature and causes of it according uuto the Romanists. Tbe
second justification, what it is in their sense. Solution of the seeming dif
fcrence between Paul and James, falsely pretended by this distinction. Jr.-
same distinction received by the Socinians, and others. The lat'. '-" -d
by some, the continuation of our justification. The distinct* ai"36^!*1
Justification considered, either as unto its essence, or its n- _..'.- ..
manifestation of it twofold, initial and final. Initial j *"**? ^SJE-"*

or others. No second justification hence ensue* - , - „ . ,

. . . ,. . _. . ,. . .ne, answered. Sense of the

legal and evangelical. Their distinct nature ,, . . ,. .

-. , /-.t . -• M among Protestants, considered. 69
derogatory to the merit of Christ. More .

unto the blood of Christ, in our justification'.!!-
. this purpose. All true justification overthrie fir8t reformation. Advantages
countenance given unto this justification in te of the consciences of men nnder
fication not intended by the apostle Jfii,tion before God. Alteration, made
Our first justification so describe, though not received. Alterations in the
»nd- ^(eV>ing world, by the introduction of Christianity. Design and

"iHcccis of the first reformer herein. Auempts for reconciliation with the Pa-

pists in this doctrine, and their success. Remainders of the ignorance of

the truth in the Roman church. Unavoidable consequences of the corruption

of this doctrine • -•-•-- 81

CHAP. I.

Justification by faith generally acknowledged. The meaning of it perverted.
The nature and use of faith in justification proposed to consideration. Dis-
tinctions about it, waved. A twofold faith of the gospel expressed in the
Scripture. Faith that is not justifying. Acts viii. 13. John ii. 33, 24.
Luke viii. tS. Mau, xiii. 28. Historical faith, whence it is so called, and
the nature of it- Degrees of assent in it. Justification not ascribed unto
any degree of it. A calumny obviated. The causes of true saving faith.

[graphic]

Page

dience proved. 1. By the experience of all believers. 2. Testimonies of

Scripture. 3. Examples. The distinction mentioned rejected 170

CHAP. VI.

Evangelical personal righteousness, the nature and use of it. Whether there be

an evangelical justification on our evangelical righteousness, inquired into.

How this is by some affirmed and applauded. Evangelical personal righte-

ousness asserted as the condition of our legal righteousness, or the pardon of

sin. Opinion of the Socinians. Personal righteousness required in the gos-

pel. Believers hence denominated righteous. Not with respect unto righte-

ousness habitual, but actual only. Inherent righteousness the same with sanc-

tification or holiness. In what sense we may be said to be justified by in-

herent righteousness. No evangelical justi6cation on our personal righte-

ousness. The imputation of the righteousness of Christ doth not depend

thereon. None have this righteousness, but they are antecedently justified.

A charge before God, in all justification before God. The instrument of this

charge; the law or the gospel. From neither of them can we be justified by

this personal righteousness. The justification pretended needless and useless.

It hath not the nature of any justification mentioned in the Scripture; but

is contrary to all that is so called. Other arguments to the same purpose.

Sentential juitification at the last day. Nature of the last judgment. Who

shall be then justified. A declaration of righteousness, and an actual ad-

mission unto glory, the whole of justification at the last day. The argument

that we are justified in this life, in the same manner, and on the same grounds

as we shall be judged at the last day, that judgment being according unto

works, answered; and the impcrtincncy of it declared 189

tfcv

n»uue£v CHAP. VII.

"^Xtfture of it. 'The first express record of justification, deter-
onto. Sincere ass'.'

. halation. Gen. xv. 6. Reasons of it. The doctrine
the gospel unto that e~t

called to believe. Ju.tifT^ lhe occaslon of"' M«i'gned and opPosed
act of the mind or will. The mT^« concernlng imputation of righteousness on
Approbation of the way of salvauS* of the reformed churches herein, parli-
nature of justifying faith. What i " »hon, opposed, and on what grounds.
J "->—... _ « « «t ^twecn 'reputarc and 'imputare.
all other ways. Ho,. » ^ ^^^ .„„„ ,lial |m.

Consent of the will unto this wa *

*• -kinds. Nature of this
heart in God. 1 Pet. i. 21. Trust ...

reason of it. Nature and object of this
.ideration of special mercy. Whether obr'
of faith, or be of the essence of it. A sincere fttfttf
inseparable from faith. How faith alone justified •apntanc*, now re-
quired in, and onto justification. How a condition ^ I** mew covenant.
Perseverance in obedience, is so also. Definitions of fait. •

CHAP. III.

t/te of faith in justification; various conceptions about it. By whom asserted,
as the instrument of it, by whom denied. In what sense it is affirmed so to
be. The expressions of the Scripture, concerning the use of faith in justifi-
cation, what they are; and how they are best explained. By an instrumental
cause. Faith, how the instrument of God in justification. How the instru-
ment of them that do believe. The use of faith expressed in the Scripture,

[graphic]

Page

Gal. iii. I3, 14. 1 Pet i. 24. Dent. xxi. 23. Testimonies of Justin Martyr,
Gregory Nyssen, Austin, Chrysostom, Bernard, Tauleras, Pighius, to that
purpose. The proper actings of faith with respect thereunto. Rom. T. 11.
Mau. xi. 28. Psal. xxxviii. 4. Gen. iv. 13. Isa. liii. 11. Gal. iii. 1. Isa. xlv.
22. John iii. 14,15. A bold calumny answered - >* 43

SECT. VL

Introduction of grace by Jesus Christ, into the whole of onr relation unto God,

and its respect unto all the parts of our obedience. No mystery of grace in

the covenant of works. All religion originally commensurate unto reason.

No notions of natural light concerning the introduction of the mediation of

Christ, and mystery of grace into our relation to God. Eph. i. 17—19.

Reason, as corrupted, can have no notions of religion, but what are derived
from its primitive state. Hence the mysteries of the gospel esteemed folly.
Reason, as corrupted, repugnant unto the mystery of grace. Accommodation
of spiritual mysteries unto corrupt reason, wherefore acceptable unto many.
Reasons of it. Two parts of corrupted nature's repugnancy unto the mystery
of the gospel. 1. That which would reduce it unto the private reason of
men. Thence the Trinity denied. And the incarnation of the Son of God.
Without which the doctrine of justification cannot stand. Rule of the
Socinians in the interpretation of the Scripture. 2. Want of a due compre-
hension of the harmony that is between all the parts of the mystery of grace.
This harmony proved. Compared with the harmony in the works of nature.
To be studied. But it is learned only of them who are taught of God ; and
in experience. Evil events of the want of a due comprehension hereof. In-
stances of them. All applied unto the doctrine of justification 56

SECT. VII.

General prejudices against the imputation of the righteousness of Christ. ». That

it is not in terms found in the Scripture, answered. 2. That nothing is said

of it in the writings of the evangelists, answered. John xx. 30, 31. Nature

of Christ's personal ministry. Revelations by the Holy Spirit immediately

from Christ. Design of the writings of the evangelists. 3. Differences

among Protestants themselves about this doctrine, answered. Sense of the

ancients herein. What is of real difference among Protestants, considered. 69

SECT. VIIL
Influence of the doctrine of justification into the first reformation. Advantages
unto the worjd by that reformation. State of the consciences of men under
the papacy, with respect unto justification before God. Alterations made

. therein by the light of this doctrine, though not received. Alterations in the

Pagan unbelieving world, by the introduction of Christianity. Design and

success of the first reformer herein. Auempts for reconciliation with the Pa-

pists in this doctrine, and their success. Remainders of the ignorance of

the truth in the Roman church. Unavoidable consequences of the corruption

of this doctrine 81

CHAP. I.

Justification by faith generally acknowledged. The meaning of it perverted.
The nature and use of faith in justificatiou proposed to consideration. Dis-
tinctions about it, waved. A twofold faith of the gospel expressed in the
Scripture. Faith that is not justifying. Acts viii. »3. John ii. 23, 24.
Luke viii. »3. Mau. x,ii. 28. Historical faith, whence it is so called, and
the nature of it. Degrees of assent in it. Justification not ascribed ""to
any degree of it. A calumny obviated. The causes of true sav"

[graphic]

Page

Conviction of tin previous unto it. The nature of legai conviction, and its

effects. Arguments to prove it antecedent unto faith. Without the consi-

deration of it, the true nature of faith not to be understood. The order and

relation of the law and gospel. Rom. i. 17. Instance of Adam. Effects

of conviction; internal; displacency and sorrow. Fear of punishment. De-

sire of deliverance. External; abstinence from sin. Performance of duties;

reformation of life. Not conditions of justification; not formal dispositions

unto it; not moral preparations for it. The order of God in justification.

The proper object of justifying faith. Not all divine verity equally; proved

by sundry arguments. The pardon of our own sins, whether the first object

of faith. The Lord Christ in the work of mediation, as the ordinance of God

for the recovery of lost sinners, the proper object of justifying faith. The po-

sition explained and proved. Hom. iii. 24, 25. Eph. i. 6—8. Acts x. 41.

xvL IS. iv. 12. Luke xxiv. 25—27.Johni.12. iu. 16.36. vi.29. vii.S8,&c.

Col. ii. 12. 1 Cor. ii. 1, 31. 2 Cor. T. 19—21 88

CHAP. n.

The nature of justifying faith in particular; or, of faith in the exercise of it,

whereby we are justified. The heart's approbation of the way of the justifi-

cation, and salvation of sinners by Christ, with its acquiescency therein. The

description given, explained, and confirmed. 1. From the nature of the gos-

pel. 2. Exemplified in its contrary, or the nature of unbelief. Prov. i. 30.

Heb. ii. 3. 1 Pet ii. 7. » Cor. i. 23, 24. 2 Cor. iv. 3, 4. What it is, and

wherein it doth consist. S. The design of God, in and by the gospel. His

own glory, his utmost end in all things. The glory of his righteousness,

grace, love, wisdom, &c. The end of God in the way of the salvation of

sinners by Christ. Rom. iii. 25. John iii. 16. 1 John iii. 16. Eph. i. 5, 6.

1 Cor. i. 24. Eph. iii. 10. Rom.i. 16. iv. 16. Eph. iii.9. 2 Cor. iv. 6. The

nature of 'aith thence declared. Faith alone ascribes and gives this glory to God.

Order ofthe^ts of faith, or the method in believing. Convictions previous there-

unto. Sincere assent unto all divine revelations; Acts xxvi. 27. The proposal of

the gospel unto that end; Rom. x. »1—13, &c. 2 Cor. iii. 18. State of persons

called to believe. Ju,tif)--)g faith doth not consist in any one single habit or

act of the mind or will. The nature of that assent which is the first act of faith.

Approbation of the way of salvation by Christ, comprehensive of the special

nature of justifying faith. What W invaded therein. ». A renunciation of

all other ways. Hos. xiv. t, S. Jer. iii. 23. Psal. vii. 16. Rom. x. 3. 2.

Consent of the will unto this wa>>Y J John xiv. 6. 3. Acquiescency of the

heart in God. 1 Pet. i. 21. TruspJ" God. Faith described by trust, the

reason of it. Nature and object of this*4,Ml»n»luired into. A double con-

sideration of special mercy. Whether obe^.nft^jfcs•sjflfjiud^cl in the nature

of faith, or be of the essence of it. A sincere purpose ofumvers!rii£gjjjc»»ce

inseparable from faith. How faith alone justifieth. RepenUnc^howiJP,

quired in, and unto justification. How a condition of the new covenant.

Perseverance in obedience, is so also. Definitions of faith 116

CHAP. III.

Use of faith in justification; various conceptions about it. By whom asserted,
as the instrument of it, by whom denied. In what sense it is affirmed so to
be. The expressions of the Scripture, concerning the use of faith in justifi-
cation, what they are; and how they are best explained. By an instrumental
cause. Faith, how the instrument of God in justification. How the instru-
ment of them that do believe. The use of faith expressed in the Scripture,

[graphic]
[graphic][merged small]

by apprehending, receiving; declared by an instrument. Faith in what

scusc the condition of our justification. Signification of that term whence to

be learned

CHAP. IV.

The proper sense of these words justification, and to justify, considered. Ne-

cessity thereof. Latin derivation of justification. Some of the ancients de-

ceived by it. From'jus,'and'justum;' 'Justus filius,'who. The Hebrew

P-T/n. Use and signification of it. Places where it is used, examined.

2 Sam. xv. 4. Deut. 21. 5. Prov. xvii. »5. Isa. v. 23. 1. 8. 1 Kings viii. 3»,

32. 2 Chron. vi. 22, 23. Psal. txixii. 3. Exod. xxiii. 7. Isa. liii. 11. Jer. xliv.

16. Dan. xii. 3. The constant sense of the word, evinced. Aixaio'u, use of

it in other authors, to punish. What it is in the New Testament, Mau. xi.

19. xii. 37. Luke vii. 29. x. 29. xvi. 15. xviii. 14. Acts xiii. 38, 39. Rom.

ii. 13. il». 4. Constantly used in a forensic sense. Places seeming dubious,

vindicated. Rom. viii. 30. 1 Cor. vi. 11. Tit. iii. 5—7. Rev. xxii. 1».

How often these words i>xtuix and hiutioxfiuti are used in the New Testa-

ment. Constant sense of this. The same evinced, from what is opposed

unto it, Isa. 1. 8. Prov. xvii. 15. Rom. v. 16.18. viii. 33, 34. And the de-

claration of it in terms equivalent. Rom. iv. 6, 7. v. 9, 10. 2 Cor. v. 20,

21. Mau. i. Z\. Acts xiii. 39. Gal. ii. »6, &c. Justification in the Scripture,

proposed under a juridical scheme, and of a forensic title. The parts and

progress of it. Instances from the whole

CHAP. V.

Distinction of a first and second justification. The whole doctrine of the Ro-
man church concerning justification grounded on this distinction. The first
justification, the nature and causes of it according unto the Romanists. Tbc
second justification, what it is in their sense. Solution of the seeming dif-
ference between Paul and James, falsely pretended by this distinction. The
same distinction received by the Socinians, and others. The lauer termed
by some, the continuation of our justification. The distiiicjuch disproved.
Justification considered, either as unto its essence, or its manifestation. The
manifestation of it twofold, initial and final. Initiaj is cither unto ourselves,
or others. No second justification hence ensues. Justification before God,
legal and evangelical. Their distinct natures. The distinction mentioned,
derogatory to the merit of Christ. More in it ascribed unto. ourselves, than
unto the blood of Christ, in our justification. The vanity of disputations to
this purpose. All true justification overthrown by this distinction. No
countenance given unto this justification in;the Scripture. The second justi-
fication not intended by the apostle Jciiies. Evil of arbitrary distinctions.
Our first justification so descrlLoa in the Scripture, as to leave no room for
a second. Of^tJartoi»Triuation of our justification: whether it depend on
fSjilr-awneT or our personal righteousness inquired. Justification at once
completed in all the causes and effects of it, proved at large. Believers upon
their justification, obliged unto perfect obedience. The commanding power
of the law constitutes the nature of sin in them, who are not obnoxious unto
its curse. Future sins, in what sense remiued at our first justification. The
continuation of actual pardon, and thereby of a justified estate, on what it
doth depend. Continuation of justification, the act of God; whereon it de-
pends in that sense. On our part it depends on faith alone. Nothing re-
quired hereunto, but the application of righteousness imputed. The conti-
nuation of our justification is befoie God. That whereon the continuation of
our justification depends, pleadable before God. This notour personal obe-

[ocr errors][merged small]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
« PreviousContinue »