A History of Black and Asian Writing in Britain, 1700-2000

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Cambridge University Press, 2002 M10 31 - 308 pages
This is the first comprehensive history of Black and Asian writers in Britain since the eighteenth century. Utilising a wealth of new archival material, Lynn Innes examines writers who arrived in England as slaves and whose work later became enormously popular. Innes examines their work as part of an acceptance of and challenge to British cultural and ideological discourses. She reveals a history of vigorous and fertile interaction between Black, Asian and white intellectuals and communities, and offers a rich historical context for understanding contemporary British multicultural society and culture.

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Contents

the historical context
7
Ignatius Sancho
17
and Mary Prince
56
The imperial century
72
nineteenthcentury
84
Mary Seacole and B M Malabari
126
Cornelia and Alice Sorabji
142
Ending empire
167
Duse Mohamed Ali antiimperial journals and black
182
Epilogue
233
Notes
245
Notes on writers
276
Bibliography
287
Index
301
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Lyn Innes is Professor of Postcolonial Literatures at the University of Kent, Canterbury. She is the author of books on Chinua Achebe, African literature, Irish literature and articles on African American and Black British writers.

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