Amadis of Gaul, Volume 2

Front Cover
J. R. Smith, 1872
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 275 - ... feathers but of a shaggy leather, black as pitch and shining, and so hard that they resist all arms, and with these wings the monster covers itself as with a shield, and from under them come its arms which are as strong as lion's paws, all covered with smaller scales, and its hands are like...
Page 164 - I will not now mention that I may not run into prolixity, so was it with Madarque in this battle. Amadis who heard him feared greatly seeing how monstrous he was, and commending himself to God, he said, now Oriana Lady mine, it is time to be succoured by you ! he then besought Don Bruneo to engage the other Knights, for he would attack the Giant, and fitted his lance under his arm and ran at him in full career, and smote him so rudely on the breast that he made him fall back upon the crupper.
Page 268 - Thus they , arrived at the palace, and there was he lodged in a rich chamber, such as became the dwelling of such a Lady, and was disarmed, and his hands and face washed from the dust, and they gave him a rosecoloured mantle. When Grasinda saw him thus attired she thought him more beautiful than she had believed mortal man could be, and she sent for a master to heal his wounds, the best and skilfullest y
Page 199 - Andandona the giantess of the Dolorous Isle ; and if I have not fulfilled my desire now, there will come a time wherein I shall be avenged. He was about to follow her on Gandalin's horse, but seeing she was a woman, he said to Gandalin, Mount ! and if you can cut off the head of that devil it will be a good thing. Gandalin went to horse directly and after her full speed ; but when Amadis saw Durin he embraced him with great pleasure, weening that he brought him news of his lady. Durin then gave him...
Page 58 - Knight of great renown. called Vadamigar, whose helmet had been struck off; he wounded the horse of Amadis in the neck, but Amadis reached him, and cleft him down to the ears, and as he fell cried out, Cousin Agrayes, take this horse! And Florestan struck down a good Knight, called Daniel, and gave his horse to Palomir, and Palomir then won one for Dragonis ; and Guilan wounded Landin sorely, and unhorsed him, and gave his horse to Branfil : thus they were all helped, and then they followed in the...
Page 275 - ... it down to the feet, not of feathers but of a shaggy leather, black as pitch and shining, and so hard that they resist all arms, and with these wings the monster covers itself as with a shield, and from under them come its arms which are as strong as...
Page 106 - ... king could be moved against one, who sleeping and waking had no thought of any thing but his service. After some days, when the three knights were healed of their wounds, they rode out one morning being richly apparelled, and after hearing mass went to the palace, where they were right welcomed by all except by the king, who neither looked at them nor received them as he was wont. Amadis did not conceive that this proceeded from any ill will, but that traitor Gandandel came up to him, and embracing...
Page 283 - ... faith, was pleased to give the knight strength and especial grace to perform what else could not by course of nature have been done. He aimed his sword at the other eye, but God guided it to one of the nostrils, for they were large and spreading, and so hard he thrust that it reached the brain, the endriago itself forcing it on; for seeing him so near, it grappled with him, and plucked him towards itself, and with its dreadful talon rent away the arms from his back, and crushed the flesh and...
Page 135 - King thereupon, that if Ardan Canileo were slain or vanquished, and the whole Island of Mongaza were not then freely surrendered, they and the Knights with them should suffer death. The Knights delivered up the Castles in their keeping, which Gromadaza will not do, therefore there neither is nor can be reason for which they should be excused from death. Ymosil replied, Certes Gandandel, you might have been excused from uttering such reasons before so good a King and such Knights as are here ! It...
Page 283 - ... pleased to give the knight strength and especial grace to perform what else could not by course of nature have been done. He aimed his sword at the other eye but God guided it to one of the nostrils, for they were large and spreading, and so hard he thrust that it reached the brain, the Endriago itself forcing it on, for seeing him so near it grappled with him and plucked him towards itself, and with its dreadful talon rent away the arms from his back, and crushed the flesh and bones to the very...

Bibliographic information