Page images
PDF
EPUB

How shall I curse whom God hath not cursed ?
And how shall I execrate whom God hath not execrated ?
For, from the top of the rocks I see him,
And from the hills I behold him:
Lo! the people who shall dwell alone,
Nor shall number themselves among the nations !
Who shall count the dust of Jacob?
Or the number of the fourth of Israel?
Let me die the death of the righteous,
And let my last end be like his !

I shall see him, but not now:
I shall behold him, but not nigh:
There shall come a star out of Jacob,
And a sceptre shall rise out of Israel,
And shall smite the corners of Moab,
And destroy all the children of Sheth.
And Edom shall be a possession,
Seir also shall be a possession for his enemies:
And Israel shall do valiantly.
Out of Jacob shall come he that shall have dominion,
And shall destroy him that remaineth of the city.

PROM

THE SONG OF

CONGREGATION

OY

MOSES TO THE

ISRAEL

DEUTERONOMY Xxxii.
VE ear, O ye heavens and I will speak :
And hear, 0 earth, the words of my mouth.
My doctrine shall drop as the rain,
My speech shall distil as the dew;
As the small rain upon the tender herb,
And as the showers upon

the

grass,
Because I will publish the name of Jehovah.
Ascribe ye majesty unto our God.
The Rock, his work is perfect;
For all his ways are righteousness :
A God of truth, and without iniquity,
Just and right is he.

[blocks in formation]

The portion of Jehovah is his people;
Jacob is the lot of his inheritance.
He found him in a desert land,
And in the waste howling wilderness :
He led him about, he instructed him;
He kept him as the apple of his eye.
As an eagle stirreth up her nest,
Fluttereth over her young,

Spreadeth abroad her wings, taketh them,
Beareth them on her wings-
So Jehovah alone did lead him,
And no strange God was with him.

CLOSE OF THE BLESSING PRONOUNCED BY MOSES ON THE

CHILDREN OF ISRAEL.

DEUTERONOMY xxxiii.
THERE is none like unto the God of Jeshurun.
He rideth upon the heavens for thy help;
In his majesty upon the sky.
The eternal God spreadeth out before thee
And beneath thee the everlasting arms:
He did thrust out the enemy from before thee,
And he said, Perish.

Therefore shall Israel dwell securely ;
The fountain of Jacob in quiet [shall flow,]
Upon a land of corn and wine :
Also his heaven shall drop down dew.

Happy art thou, O Israel !
Who is like unto thee, O people redeemed,
By Jehovah, the shield of thy help,
And the sword of thy majesty!
Thine enemies shall submit themselves unto thee,
And thou shalt tread upon their high places.

DAVID'S LAMENTATION FOR SAUL AND JONATHAN.*

IT. SAMUEL. i. 19-29.
The glory of Israel is slain upon thy high places:
How are the mighty fallen!
Tell it not in Gath :
Publish it not in the streets of Askelon:
Lest the daughters of the Philistines be glad,
Lest the daughters of the uncircumcised triumph.

Oh mountains of Gilboa ! let there be no dew,
Nor rain upon you, nor fields of first fruits :

* All those extracts from the Sacred Poets, to which the name of the translator is not prefixed, are translated by the Editor. The English translators of the Bible performed their task with beautiful simplicity, and much faithfulness ;-and though the critical translator requires the most unwearied patience in long, minute, and repeated investigation, yet, with the Editor of the present volume, whose object is simply to present an unstudied picture of the beauty of the original, it is often times! sufficient for the accomplishment of his purpose, to divide the common version (almost unaltered except in the correction of evident mistakes) into the parallelistic lines of the Hebrew.

For there the shield of the mighty was thrown away;
The shield of Saul,-weapons anointed with oil.

From the blood of the slain, from the fat of the mighty,
The bow of Jonathan turned not back,
The sword of Saul returned not empty.

Saul and Jonathan ! Beautiful and pleasant in their lives, In their death they were not divided. They were swifter than eagles, they were stronger than lions.

o daughters of Israel! weep over Saul ! He clothed you with scarlet, in loveliness : He added ornaments of gold to your apparel.

How are the mighty fallen in the midst of the battle !

Jonathan, slain in thine high places !
Sorrow is upon me, for thee, my brother Jonathan :
Thou wast pleasant unto me, exceedingly :
Wonderful was thy love to me, passing the love of women.

How are the mighty fallen!
And the weapons of war perished !

THE TRIUMPHAL SONG OF MOSES AFTER THE PASSAGE OF

THE RED SEA.

EXODUS XV.

I WILL sing unto Jehovah, for he is gloriously exalted;
The horse and his rider hath he whelmed in the sea.
My praise and any song is Jehovah,
And he is become my salvation :
He is my God, and I will praise him;
My father's God, and I will exalt him.

Jehovah is a man of war: Jehovah is his name.
The chariots of Pharaoh and his host hath he thrown in the

sea; And his choicest leaders are thrown in the Red Sea. The floods have covered them: they went down; Into the abyss (they went down] as a stone. Thy right hand, ( Jehovah, hath made itself glorious in

power: Thy right hand, O Jehovah, hath dashed in pieces the enemy. And in the strength of thy majesty thou hast destroyed thine

adversaries. Thou didst let loose thy wrath: it consumed them like

stubble. With the blast of thy nostrils the waters were heaped together : The flowing waters* stood upright as an heap: The floods were congealed in the heart of the sea.

* In the original,—“The flowing stood upright" &c. the participle of the verb to flow being the poetical form for waters.

The enemy said, I will pursue, I will overtake:
I will divide the spoil, my soul shall be satisfied:
I will draw my sword, my hand shall destroy them.

Thou didst blow with thy breath, the sea covered them: They sank as lead in the mighty waters.

Who is like unto thee among the gods, O Jehovah! Who is like unto thee, making thyself glorious in holiness! Fearful in praises, executing wonders. Thou didst stretch out thy right hand,—the earth swallowed

them. Thou hast led forth in thy mercy the people whom thou hast

redeemed: Thou hast guided them in thy strength to the habitation of thy

holiness. The people shall hear and be disquieted : Terror shall seize the inhabitants of Philistia. Then the nobles of Edom shall be confounded; The mighty ones of Moab, trembling shall take hold upon

them: All the inhabitants of Canaan shall melt away: Terror and perplexity shall fall upon them: Because of the greatness of thine arm they shall be as still as

a stone; Till thy people pass over, O Jehovah, Till thy people pass over, whom thou hast redeemed: Thou shalt bring them in, and plant them in the mountains of

thine inheritance, The place for thy dwelling, which thou hast prepared, O

Jehovah!
The sanctuary, O Lord, which thy hands have established.
Jehovah shall reign forever and ever!

TRANSLATIONS FROM THE BOOK OF JOB.

BY THE REV. GEORGE R. NOYES.

“ The leading design of the poem is to establish the truth that character is not to be inferred from external condition ; and to enforce the duty of submission to the will of God."

It is probably more ancient than the earliest remains of any uninspired poetry, and as a whole it is without doubt the most sublime production in the orld. It also contains chapters, of a beauty which is never to be equalled, except by some other poetical portions in the same sacred volume, of which it constitutes only a part. It cannot be too reverently nor too often perused. Here, poetry enraptures while religion purifies the soul. We are too forgetful of the debt of gratiude we owe to the author of our being, in that he has not only written, as with a sunbeam, the instructions which we needed in the way of life,

but has sublimely adapted the inspired volume to the nature of the human intellect and imagination; so that its pages are full of ever increasing delight, as well as sanctifying influence, to the wisest and most cultivated mind.

THE BENEFIT OF AFFLICTION.

CHAPTER V. VERSES 17-27.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth;
Therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty.
For he bruiseth, and bindeth up;
He woundeth, and his hands make whole.
He will deliver thee in six troubles,
Yea, in seven shall no evil touch thee.
In famine he will redeem thee from death,
And in war from the power of the sword.
Thou shalt be safe from the scourge of the tongue,
And shalt not be afraid of destruction, when it cometh.
At devastation and famine thou shalt laugh,
And shalt not be afraid of the wild beasts of the land.
For thou shalt be in league with the stones of the field,
Yea, the beasts of the forest shall be at peace with thee.
Thou shalt find also that thy habitation is in peace;
Thou shalt visit thy dwelling, and not be disappointed.
Thou shalt see thy descendants numerous,
And thine offspring as the grass of the earth.
Thou shalt come to thy grave in full strength,
As a shock of corn gathered in its season.
Lo! this we have searched out; so it is ;
Hear it, and lay it up in thy mind.

2

THE WRETCHEDNESS OF THE WICKED.

1

CHAPTER XVIII. VERSES 5-21.
Behold! the light of the wicked shall be put out,
And the flame of his fire shall not shine.
Light shall become darkness in his tabernacle,
And his lamp over him shall be extinguished.
The steps of his strength shall be straitened,
And his own counsel shall cast him down.
He is brought into the net by his own feet,
And he walketh upon toils.
The springe layeth hold of him by the heel,
And the snare holdeth him fast.
A net is secretly laid for him on the ground,
And a trap for him in the pathway.
Terrors assail him on every side,
And pursue him at his heels.
His strength is wasted by hunger,
And ruin is present at his side.

« PreviousContinue »