A Smaller Classical Mythology: With Translations from the Ancient Poets, and Questions Upon the Work

Front Cover
William Smith
John Murray, 1882 - 283 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 122 - Thammuz came next behind, Whose annual wound in Lebanon allured The Syrian damsels to lament his fate In amorous ditties all a summer's day, While smooth Adonis from his native rock Ran purple to the sea, supposed with blood Of Thammuz yearly wounded...
Page 49 - With many a weary step, and many a groan, Up the high hill he heaves a huge round stone; The huge round stone, resulting with a bound, Thunders impetuous down, and smokes along the ground.
Page 282 - STUDENT'S HISTORY OF ROME. From the EARLIEST TIMES to the ESTABLISHMENT OF THE EMPIRE, With Chapters on the History of Literature and Art. By Dean LIDDELL.
Page 10 - No walls were yet; nor fence, nor moat, nor mound, Nor drum was heard, nor trumpet's angry sound; Nor swords were forged ; but void of care and crime. The soft creation slept away their time.
Page 112 - Men called him Mulciber ; and how he fell From heaven, they fabled, thrown by angry Jove Sheer o'er the crystal battlements : from morn To noon he fell, from noon to dewy eve, A summer's day ; and with the setting sun Dropt from the zenith like a falling star, On Lemnos the /Egean isle : thus they relate, Erring...
Page 42 - Far off from these a slow and silent stream, Lethe, the river of oblivion, rolls Her wat'ry labyrinth, whereof who drinks Forthwith his former state and being forgets, Forgets both joy and grief, pleasure and pain.
Page 75 - Or view the Lord of the unerring bow, The God of life, and poesy, and light The Sun in human limbs array'd, and brow All radiant from his triumph in the fight; The shaft hath just been shot the arrow bright With an immortal's vengeance; in his eye And nostril beautiful disdain, and might, And majesty, flash their full lightnings by Developing in that one glance the Deity.
Page 186 - Pelops' line, Or the tale of Troy divine, Or what (though rare) of later age, Ennobled hath the buskined stage. But O, sad Virgin, that thy power Might raise Musaeus from his bower, Or bid the soul of Orpheus sing Such notes as warbled to the string, Drew iron tears down Pluto's cheek, And made Hell grant what Love did seek.
Page 84 - How the pale Phoebe, hunting in a grove, First saw the boy Endymion, from whose eyes She took eternal fire that never dies; How she...

Bibliographic information