The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.

Front Cover
Alexander V. Blake, 1840
 

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Contents

The power of novelty Mortality too fami liar to raise apprehensions
78
A suspicious man justly suspected
79
Variety necessary to happiness A Winter
80
SCene 81 The great rule of action Debts of justice to be distinguished from debts of charity
81
The virtuosos account of his rarities
82
The virtuosos curiosity justified
83
A young ladys impatience of control
84
The mischiefs of total idleness
85
An introduction to a criticism on Miltons versification
86
The reasons why advice is generally ineſ fectual
87
A criticism on Miltons versification Eli sions dangerous in Engish poetry
88
The luxury of vain imagination
89
The pauses in English poetry adjusted
90
The conduct of patronage an allegory
91
The accommodation of sound to sense often chimerical
92
The prejudices and caprices of criticism
93
An inquiry how far Nº has accommo dated the sound to the sense
94
The history of Pertinax the sceptic
95
Truth falsehood and fiction an allegory
96
Advice to unmarried ladies
97
The necessity of cultivating politeness
98
The pleasures of private friendship Th necessity of similar dispositions
99
Modish pleasures
100
A proper audience necessary to a
101
The voyage of life
102
The prevalence of curiosity The charac ter of Nugaculus
103
The original of flattery The meanness of venal praise
104
The universal register a dream
105
The vanity of an authors expectations Reasons why good authors are sometimes neglected
106
Properantias hopes of a year of confusion T misery of prostitutes
107
Life º to all purposes if well em Oyed
108
The education of a
109
Repentance stated and explained Retire ment and abstinence useful to repentance
110
Youth made unfortunate by its haste and eagerness
111
Too much nicety not to be indulged The character of Eriphile
112
The history of Hymenteuss courtship
113
The necessity of proportioning punishments to crimes
114
The sequel of Hymenaeuss courtship
115
The young traders attempt at politeness
116
The advantages of living in a garret
117
The narrowness of fame
118
Trauquillos account of her lovers opposed to Hymenteus
119
The history of Almamoulin the son of Nouradin 114 116 117 118
120
PAdg 121 The dangers of imitation The impropriety of imitating Spenser
121
A criticism on the English historians
122
The young trader turned gentleman
123
The ladys misery in a summer retirement
124
The difficulty of defining comedy Tragic and comic sentiments confounded
125
The universality of cowardice The impro priety of extorting praise The imper tinence of an astronomer
126
Anxiety universal The unhappiness of a wit and a fine lady
128
The folly of cowardice and inactivity
129
The history of a beauty
130
Desire of gain the general passion
131
The difficulty of educating a young noble
132
The miseries of a beauty defaced
133
Idleness an anxious and miserable state
134
The folly of annual retreats into the country The meanness and mischief of indiscrimi nate dedication
138
A critical examination of Samson Agonistes
139
The criticism continued
140
The danger of attempting wit in conversa tion The character of Papilius
141
An account of squire Bluster
142
The criterions plagiarism
143
The difficulty of raising reputation The various species of detractors
144
Petty writers not to be despised
145
An account of an author travelling in quest
146
of his own character The uncertainty of fame 147 The courtiers esteem of assurance 148 The cruelty of parental tyranny
148
Benefits not always entitled to gratitude
149
Adversity useful to the acquisition of know ledge
150
The timeline of the mind
151
Criticism on epistolary writings
152
The treatment incurred by loss of fortun
153
The inefficacy of genius without learning
154
The usefulness of advice The danger of habits The necessity of reviewing life
155
The laws of writing not always indisputable Reflections on
156
The scholars complaint of his own bashful ness
157
Rules of writing drawn from examples Those examples often mistaken
158
The nature and remedies of bashfulness
159
Rules for the choice of associates
160
The revolutions of a garret
161
Old men in danger of falling into pupilage The conduct of Thrasybulus
162
The mischiefs of following a patron
163
Praise universally desired he ſailings of eminent men often imitated
164
The impotence of wealth The visit of Serotinus to the place of his nativity
165
Favours not easily gained by the poor
166
The marriage of Hymeneus and Tranquilla
167
Poetry debased by mean expressions An example from Shakspeare
168
Labour necessary to excellence
169
The history of Miscella debauched by her relation
170
Miscellas description of the life of a pros titute
171
The effect of sudden riches upon the man hºrs
172
Unreasonable fears of pedantry
173
The mischiefs of unbounded raillery His
174
ſhe majority are wicked 265 107 wº is the world divided by such difference
175
Directions to authors attacked by critics of opinion The various degrees of critical perspi cacity
176
An account of a club of antiquaries
177
Many advantages not to be enjoyed together
178
Tae awkward merriment of a student
179
Favour of en gained with little assistance from understanding
188
The mischiefs of falsehood
189
tory of Dicaculus
190
The character
191
Resemblance between authors 99 The fate of projectors
199
Life of Mercator
206
U8
209
261
262
271
272
276
277
of Turpicula
283
The history of Abouzaid the son of Morad
284
The busy life of a young lady
285
Love unsuccessful without riches
286
The authors art of praising himself
288
A young noblemans progress in politeness
289
A young noblemans introduction to the knowledge of the town
290
youth fallacious
292
The history of a legacy hunter
293
The legacy hunters history concluded
294
The virtues of Rabbi Abrahams magnet
296
Aspers complaint of the insolence of Pros pero Unpoliteness not always the effect of pride
297
The importance of punctuality
299
The pleasures of life to be sought in pros pects of futurity Future ſame uncertain
301
The history of ten days of Seged emperor of Ethiopia
302
The history of Seged concluded
304
The art of living at the cost of others
305
The folly of continuing too long upon the stage
306
THE ADVENTURER 34 story of Mysargyras
310
g
311
Story of Mysargyras concluded
313
Want of strength and unity in confederated power
314
The causes of falsehood
316
Letter of Mysargyras
317
Letter of Mysargyras
322
Men willingly believe what they wish to be true
324
Advice useful and salutary
325
Whether a man should think too highly or too meanly of himself
327
Qn the diversity of the English character
329
The necessity of reading and consulting other understandings than our own
330
385
337
Some images and sentiments of which the mind of man may be said to be enamoured
340
Examination of the pretensions that are made to happiness
341
Misery the lot of man and our present state one of danger and infelicity
346
Retirement
347
The employment of mankind 131 The neglect of little things 137 Retrospect of the papers of the Adventurer 188 The condition of authors with regar...
351
THE IDLER
356
Idlers character
357
Invitation to correspondents
358
Idlers reason for writing
359
Charities and hospitals
360
Proposal for a female army
361
performance on horseback ib 7 Scheme for news writers
362
Plan of military discipline
364
Progress of idleness
365
Political credulity
366
Discourses on the weather
367
Marriages why advertised ib 13 The imaginary housewife
368
Robbery of time
370
Druggets retirement
371
Expedients of Idlers
372
Drugget vindicated
373
Whirlers character
374
Louisbourgs histo
375
Imprisonment of debtors
377
Uncertainty of friendshi
378
Man does not always think ib 25 New actors on the theatre
379
Betty Brooms history
380
Wedding dayGrocers wifeChairman
382
Betty Brooms history
383
Sleep
386
Journal of a fellow of a college
387
Punch and conversation
388
Auction hunter
389
The terrific diction
390
Iron and gold
391
Debtors in Prison 892
392
The bracelet
393
Art of advertising
395
Perditas complaint of her father 896
398
Portraits defended
399
Molly Quicks complaint of her mistress
400
Deborah Gingers account of city wits
401
The bustles of Idleness
402
Marvels journey
403
Marvel paralleled
404
Domestic greatness unattainable
405
Self denial necessary ib 53 Mischiefs of good company
406
Mrs Savecharges complaint
407
Authors mortifications
409
Virtuosos whimsical
410
Character of Sophron the prudent
411
Expectations of pleasure frustrated
412
The good sort of woman
451
The Fountains a Fairy Tale
494
to LIII To Mrs Thrale
525
Poemati
560

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Page xiv - I had exhausted all the art of pleasing which a retired and uncourtly scholar can possess. I had done all that I could ; and no man is well pleased to have his all neglected, be it ever so little.
Page xiv - Is not a patron, my Lord, one who looks with unconcern on a man struggling for life in the water, and, when he has reached ground, encumbers him with help ? The notice which you have been pleased to take of my labours, had it been early, had been kind ; but it has been delayed till I am indifferent, and cannot enjoy it ; till I am solitary, and cannot impart it ; till I am known, and do not want it.
Page xiv - I have been lately informed by the proprietor of ' The World,' that two papers, in which my ' Dictionary ' is recommended to the public, were written by your lordship. To be so distinguished, is an honour, which, being very little accustomed to favours from the great, I know not well how to receive, or in what terms to acknowledge. " When, upon some slight encouragement, I first visited your lordship, I was overpowered, like the rest of mankind, by the enchantment of your address, and could not...
Page 102 - If we owe regard to the memory of the dead, there is yet more respect to be paid to knowledge, to virtue, and to truth.
Page 109 - By degrees we let fall the remembrance of our original intention, and quit the only adequate object of rational desire. We entangle ourselves in business, immerge ourselves in luxury, and rove through the labyrinths of inconstancy, till the darkness of old age begins to invade us, and disease and anxiety obstruct our way.
Page iii - He appears by his modest and unaffected narration to have described things as he saw them, to have copied nature from the life, and to have consulted his senses, not his imagination; he meets with no basilisks that destroy with their eyes, his crocodiles devour their prey without tears, and his cataracts fall from the rock without deafening the neighbouring inhabitants.
Page 109 - ... yet remains one effort to be made ; that reformation is never hopeless, nor sincere endeavours ever unassisted; that the wanderer may at length return after all his errors, and that he who implores strength and courage from above, shall find danger and difficulty give way before him. Go now, my son, to thy repose, commit thyself to the care of Omnipotence, and when the morning calls again to toil, begin anew thy journey and thy life.
Page 101 - ALL joy or sorrow for the happiness or calamities of others is produced by an act of the imagination, that realizes the event however fictitious, or approximates it however remote, by placing us, for a time, in the condition of him whose fortune we contemplate ; so that we feel, while the deception lasts, whatever motions would be excited by the same good or evil happening to ourselves.
Page 102 - Catiline, to remark that his walk was now quick, and again slow, as an indication of a mind revolving something with violent commotion. Thus the story of Melancthon affords a striking lecture on the value of time, by informing us that, when he made an appointment, he- expected not only the hour but the minute to be fixed, that the day might not run out in the idleness of suspense...
Page xiv - Having carried on my work thus far with so little obligation to any favourer of learning, I shall not be disappointed though I should conclude it, if less be possible, with less ; for I have been long wakened from that dream of hope, in which I once boasted myself with so much exultation. My Lord, your lordship's most humble, most obedient servant,

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