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" All the images of nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously but luckily: when he describes anything you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation: he was... "
The Monthly Mirror: Reflecting Men and Manners: With Strictures on Their ... - Page 337
1804
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The Monthly Review, Or, Literary Journal, Volume 70

1784
...learning, give him the greateft commendation. He was naturally learned. He needed not the fpeftacles of books to' read nature. He looked inward, and found her there. I cannot fay he is every where alike. Were he fo, I fliould do him injury, to compare him to the greateft of...
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The Dramatick Writings of Will. Shakspere: With the Notes of All ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1788
...too. Those, who accuse him to have wanted " learning, give him the greater commendation : he *' was naturally learned: he needed not the spectacles " of books to read nature ; he looked inwards, and " found her there, I cannot say he is every where " alike ; were he so, I should do him...
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The Critical and Miscellaneous Prose Works of John Dryden ..., Volume 1, Part 2

John Dryden - 1800 - 596 pages
...feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation : he was naturally learned ; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature ; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is every where alike; were he so, I should do him injury...
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Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres, Volume 2

Hugh Blair - 1802
...give him the greateft commendation. He was naturally learned. He needed not the fpeftacles of hooks to read nature. He looked inward, and found her there. I cannot fay he is every where alike. Were he fo, I fliould do him injury, " to compare him to the greateft...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1803
...feel it too. Those, who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation; he was naturally learned ; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is every where alike ; were lie so, I should do him injury...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: With Notes of Various Commentators, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1806
...feel it too. Those, who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation; he was naturally learned; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is every where alike; were he so, I should do him injury...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, Volume 2

Samuel Johnson - 1806
...was naturally learned : he needed not the &pec" tacles of books to read nature ; he looked m" wards, and found her there. I cannot say he " is every where alike j were he so, I should do " him injury to compare him with the greatest of " mankind. He is many times...
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Specimens of English prose-writers, from the earliest times to the ..., Volume 3

George Burnett - 1807
...feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation : he was naturally learned ; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is every where alike ; were he so, I should do him injury...
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Specimens of English Prose Writers: From the Earliest Times to the Close of ...

George Burnett - 1807
...feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation : he was naturally learned ; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is every where alike ; were he so, I should do him injury...
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The Works of John Dryden: Now First Collected ...

John Dryden, Walter Scott - 1808
...feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation : he was naturally learned; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature ; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is every where alike ; were he so, I should do him injury...
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