Shakespeare's King Henry the Fifth: With Introduction, and Notes Explantory and Critical. For Use in Schools and Families

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Ginn, Heath, & Company, 1882 - 194 pages

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Page 74 - A made a finer end, and went away, an it had been any Christom child ; 'a parted even just between twelve and one, e'en at turning o' the tide ; for after I saw him fumble with the sheets, and play with flowers, and smile upon his fingers...
Page 85 - And you, good yeomen, Whose limbs were made in England, show us here The mettle of your pasture ; let us swear That you are worth your breeding ; which I doubt not ; For there is none of you so mean and base, That hath not noble lustre in your eyes.
Page 52 - The act of order to a peopled kingdom. They have a king and officers of sorts; Where some, like magistrates, correct at home, Others, like merchants, venture trade abroad, Others, like soldiers, armed in their stings, Make boot upon the summer's velvet buds, Which pillage they with merry march bring home To the tent-royal of their ( emperor...
Page 130 - God's will ! I pray thee, wish not one man more. By Jove, I am not covetous for gold, Nor care I who doth feed upon my cost ; It yearns me not if men my garments wear ; Such outward things dwell not in my desires : But if it be a sin to covet honour, 1 am the most offending soul alive.
Page 130 - I am the most offending soul alive. No, faith, my coz, wish not a man from England: God's peace! I would not lose so great an honour, As one man more, methinks , would share from me, For the best hope I have. O , do not wish one more ! Rather proclaim it, Westmoreland, through my host, That he which hath no stomach to this fight, Let him depart...
Page 5 - Like to the senators of the antique Rome, With the plebeians swarming at their heels, Go forth and fetch their conquering Caesar in : As, by a lower but loving likelihood, Were now the general of our gracious empress, As in good time he may, from Ireland coming, Bringing rebellion broached on his sword, How many would the peaceful city quit, To welcome him ! much more, and much more cause, Did they this Harry.
Page 85 - Disguise fair nature with hard-favour'd rage; Then lend the eye a terrible aspect; Let it pry through the portage of the head Like the brass cannon; let the brow o'erwhelm it As fearfully as doth a galled rock O'erhang and jutty his confounded base, Swill'd with the wild and wasteful ocean.
Page 131 - This story shall the good man teach his son; And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by, From this day to the ending of the world, But we in it...
Page 37 - O for a Muse of fire, that would ascend The brightest heaven of invention, A kingdom for a stage, princes to act, And monarchs to behold the swelling scene...
Page 188 - And rouse him at the name of Crispian. He that shall live this day, and see old age, Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours, And say To-morrow is Saint Crispian :' Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars, And say 'These wounds I had on Crispin's day.

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