Bentley's Miscellany, Volume 22

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Charles Dickens, William Harrison Ainsworth, Albert Smith
Richard Bentley, 1847

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Page 394 - Be Yarrow stream unseen, unknown, It must, or we shall rue it, We have a vision of our own, Ah ! why should we undo it...
Page 169 - And pinch'd with cold, and shrinking from the shower, With heavy heart deplores that luckless hour, When idly first, ambitious of the town, She left her wheel and robes of country brown.
Page 200 - Its loveliness increases ; it will never Pass into nothingness ; but still will keep A bower quiet for us, and a sleep Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing. Therefore, on every morrow, are we wreathing A flowery band to bind us to the earth...
Page 309 - Friends and comrades!" he said, "on that side are toil, hunger, nakedness, the drenching storm, desertion, and death; on this side, ease and pleasure. There lies Peru with its riches; here, Panama and its poverty. Choose, each man, what best becomes a brave Castilian. For my part, I go to the south.
Page 68 - The night has been unruly : where we lay, Our chimneys were blown down : and, as they say, Lamentings heard i' the air ; strange screams of death: And, prophesying with accents terrible Of dire combustion and confused events, New hatch'd to the woeful time, The obscure bird clamour'd the live-long night : Some say the earth was feverous, and did shake.
Page 554 - I will go with her willingly. Nothing can be more affecting and melancholy to me than what I see here : yet he takes my visit so kindly, that I should have lost one great pleasure, had I not come. I have nothing more to say, as I have nothing in my mind but this present object, which indeed is extraordinary. This man was never born to die like other men, any more than to live like them.* I am ever yours, &c.
Page 553 - Thou wild thing, that always art leaping or aching, What black, brown, or fair, in what clime, in what nation, By turns has not taught thee a pit-a-patation ?
Page 541 - A fiery soul, which, working out its way, Fretted the pigmy body to decay, And o'er-informed the tenement of clay...
Page 271 - with one foot on the land, and the other on the sea...
Page 252 - Some hands unseen strew'd flowers upon his tomb; Perhaps the weakness of a heart not void Of feeling for some kindness done, when power Had left the wretch an uncorrupted hour.

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