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52

CHARACTER.

CHARITY,

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Formed on the good old plan, A true and brave and downright honest man! He blew no trumpet in the market-place, Nor in the church, with hypocritic face Supplied with cant the lack of Christian

grace; Loathing pretence, he did with cheerful

will What others talked of, while their hands

were still.

WHITTIER-Daniel Neall.
Whom neither shape of anger can dismay,
Nor thought of tender happiness betray.
WORDSWORTH-Character of the

llappy Warrior. And let men so conduct themselves in life As to be always strangers to defeat.

YONGE's Cicero- A precept of Atreus.

Tusculan Disp. Bk. V. Div. 18. The man that makes a character, makes foes. P. YOUNG--Epistles to Mr. Pope. Ep. 1.

Line 28.

Fame is what you have taken,

Character's what you give;
When to this truth you waken,
Then you begin to live.
Bayard TAYLOR- Improvisations.

St. II.

0.

The hearts that dare are quick to feel; The hands that wound are soft to heal. d. BAYARD TAYLOR-Soldiers of Peace.

St. 1.

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C.

So may he rest; his faults lie gently on him!

p. Henry VIII. Act IV. Sc. 2.

He is truly great, that is great in charity.
THOMAS À KEMPIS - Imitation of

Christ. Bk. I. Ch. III. Act a charity sometimes. b. LAMB-Complaint of the Decay of

Beggars in the Metropolis. Shut not thy purse-strings Always against painted distress. LAMB-Complaint of the Decay of

Beygars in the Metropolis. With malice towards none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right.

d. LINCOLN -- Second Inaugural Address. O chime of sweet Saint Charity,

Peal soon that Easter morn
When Christ for all shall risen be,

And in all hearts new-born!
That Pentecost when utterance clear

To all men shall be given,
When all can say My Brother here,
And hear My Son in heaven!

LOWELL--Godminster Chimes.

We are born to do benefits.

0, what a precious comfort 'tis to have so many, like brothers, commanding one another's fortunes! 9. Timon of Athens. Act I, Sc. 2.

'Tis a little thing To give a cup of water; yet its draught Of cool refreshment; drain'd by fever'd lips, May give a shock of pleasure to the frame More exquisite than when nectarean juice Renews the life of joy in happiest hours.

TALFOURD-Ion. Act I. Sc. 2.

e.

r.

CHASE, THE.
Brond are these streams-my steed obeys,

Plunges, and bears me through the tide. Wide are these woods--I thread the maze

Of giant stems, nor ask a guide. I hunt till day's last glimmer dies

O'er woody vale and grassy height; And kind the voice, and glad the eyes That welcome my return at night.

BRYANT- The Hunter of the Prairies. Soon as Aurora drives away the night, And edges eastern clouds with rosy light, The healthy huntsman, with the cheerful

horn, Summons the dogs, and greets the dappled

morn. t. GAY- Rural Sports. Canto II. Line 93.

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The soul of the truly benevolent man does not seem to reside much in its own body. Its life, to a great extent, is a mere reflex of the lives of others. It migrates into their bodies, and, identifying its existence with their existence, finds its own happiness in increasing and prolonging their pleasures, in extinguishing or solacing their pains. f. HORACE MANN-- Lectures on Elucation.

Lecture IV. To pity distress is but human; to relieve it is Godlike. g. HORACE MANN— Lectures on Elucation.

Lecture VI. They serve God well, Who serves His creatures. h. Mrs. NORTON--The Lady of Lu Garaye.

Conclusion. Line 9. With one hand he put A penny in the urn of poverty, And with the other took a shilling out. POLLOK --Course of Time. Bk. VIII.

Line 632. In Faith and Hope the world will disagree, But all mankind's concern is charity. j. POPE--Essay on Man. Ep. III.

Line 307 So much his courage and his mercy strive, He wounds to cure, and conquers to forgive. k. PRIOR-Ode in Imitation of Horace.

Bk. III. Ode II. An old man, broken with the storms of state, Is come to lay his weary bones among ye; Give him a little earth for charity ! 1. Henry VIII. Act IV. Sc. 2.

Charity, Which renders good for bad, blessings for

curses.

Richard III. Act I. Sc. 2.

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54

CHASTITY.

CHILDREN.

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CHILDREN.

'Tis Chastity,' my brother, Chastity; She that has that is clad in complete steel, And, like a quiver'd nymph, with arrows

keen, May trace huge forests, and unharbour'd

heaths, Infamous hills, and sandy perilous wilds; Where, through the sacred rays of Chastity, No savage tierce, bandite, or mountaineer, Will dare to soil her virgin purity.

MILTON- Comus. Line 420. As chaste as unsunn'd snow, b. Cymbeline. Act II. Sc. 5.

Chaste as the icicle, That's curded by the frost from purest snow, And hangs on Dian's temple.

Coriolanus. Act V. Sc. 3.
My chastity's the jewel of our house,
Bequeathed down from my ancestors.
d. All's Weil That Ends Well. Act IV.

Sc. 2. The very ice of chastity is in them.

As You Like Il. Act III. Sc. 4. Whiter than new snow on a raven's back.

f. Romeo and Juliet. Act III. Sc. 2. To the pure all things are pure ! 9. SHELLEYThe Revolt of Islam.

Canto VI. St. 30. Then she rode forth, clothed on with chastity: The deep air listen'd round her as she rode, And all the low wind hardly breathed for fear.

h. TENNYSON- Godiva. Line 53.

'Tis not a life; 'Tis but a piece of childhood thrown away. BEAUMONT and FLETCHER -- Philaster.

Act V. Sc, 2.

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CHEERFULNESS. A cheerful temper, joined with innocence, will make beauty attractive, knowledge delightful, and wit good-natured.

i ADDISON- The Tattler. No. 192,

Cheerfulness is an offshoot of goodness and of wisdom. j. BOVEE-Summaries of Thought.

Cheerfulness. And if I laugh at any mortal thing, 'Tis that I may not weep.

k. BYRON- Don Juan. Canto IV. St. 4. Cheerful at morn he wakes from short repose, Breathes the keen air, and carols as he goes. I.

GOLDSMITH -- The Traveller. Line 185. A merry heart goes all the day, Your sad tires in a mile-a.

A Winter's Tale. Act IV. Sc. 2.

Had she been light, like you, Of such a merry, nimble, stirring spirit, She might have been a grandam ere she died; And so may you; for a light heart lives long.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act V. Sc. 2. He makes a July's day short as December; And, with his varying childness, cures in me Thoughts that would thick my blood.

A Winter's Tale. Act I. Se, 2.

Ah! what would the world be to us,
If the children were no more ?
We should dread the desert behind us
Worse than the dark before.

LONGFELLOW-Children. St. 4.

m.

n.

O child! O new-born denizen
Of life's great city! on thy head
The glory of the morn is shed
Like a celestial benison!
Here at the portal thou dost stand,
And with thy little hand
Thou openest the mysterious gate
Into the future's undiscovered land.

LONGFELLOW- To a Child.

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56

CHOICE.

CHRISTIAN.

Of two evils I have chose the least.

a. PRIOR- Imitation of Horace.

Choose always the way that seems the best, however rough it may be. Custom will render it easy and agreeable.

b. PYTHAGORAS.

m.

c.

.

Who did leave his Father's throne,
To assume thy flesh and bone?
Had he life, or had he none ?
If he had not liv'd for thee,
Thou hadst died most wretchedly;
And two deaths had been thy fee.

HERBERT The Temple. Business,
One name above all glorious names

With its ten thousand tongues The everlasting sea proclaims, Echoing angelic songs.

KEBLE — Septuagesima Sunday. All the glory and beauty of Christ are manifested within, and there he delights to dwell; his visits there are frequent, his condescension amazing, his conversations sweet, his comforts refreshing; and the peace that he brings passeth all understanding.

THOMAS À KEMPIS. God never gave man a thing to do concerning which it were irreverent to ponder how the Son of God would have done it. P. GEORGE MACDONALD— The Marquis of

Lossie. Ch. LI\.

I will not choose what many men desire, Because I will not jump with common

spirits, And rank me with the barbarous multitudes.

Merchant of Venice. Act II. Sc. 9. Preferment goes by letter, and affection.

d. Othello. Act I. Sc. 1. There's a small choice in rotten apples.

Taming of the Shrere. Act I. Sc. 1.

Which of them shall I take? Both ? one? or neither? Neither can be en

joy’d, If both remain alive.

King Lear. Act V. Sc. 1.

Great God ? I'd rather be A Pagan, sickled in a creed outworn; So might I, standing on this pleasant lea, Have glimpses, that would make me less for

lorn; Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea; Or hear old Triton blow his wreathed horn. 9. WORDSWORTH -- Miscellaneous Sonpets.

Pt. I. Sonnet XXIII. A strange alternntive Must women have a doctor or a dance? h. YOUNG-- Lore of Fame. Satire V.

Line 192.

e.

The pilot of the Galilean lake.
9.
MILTON Lycielus. Line 109.

Thou, Whom soft-eyed Pity once led down from

Heaven To bleed for Man, to teach him how to live, And oh! still harder lesson, how to die !

7. BISHOP PORTEUS--Death, Line 316.

CHRIST.

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Star unto star speaks light, and world to

world Repeats the passage of the universe To God; the name of Christ-the one great

word Well worth all languages in earth or Heaven.

i. BAILEY Festus. Sc. Heaven.

In those holy fields Over whose acres walk'd those blessed feet, Which fourteen hundred years ago, were

nail'i For our advantage on the bitter cross.

Henry IV. Pt. I. Act I, Sc. 1. ! And so the Word had breath, and wrought

With human hands the creed of creedis

In lovliness of perfect dee.is,
More strong than all poetic thought;
Which lie may read that binds the sheaf,

Or builds the house or digs the grave,

And those wild eyes that watch the waves In roarings round the coral reef.

t. TENNISON-- In Memoriam. Pt. XXXVI. i His love at once, and dread instruct our

thought; As man he sufier'd and as God he tanght.

WALLER - Of Divine Lore. Line 41

Lovely was the deatlı Of Him whose life was Love! Holy, with

power. He on the thought-benighted Skeptic beamed Manifest Godhead. j. COLERIDGE -- Religious Musings.

Line 29.

u.

He was the Word that spake it;
He took the bread and brake it;
And what that Word did make it,
I do believe and take it.
k. DONNE--Divine Poems. On the

Sacrament.

V.

In darkness there is no choice. It is light, that enables us to see the ditferences between things ; and it is Christ, that gives us light. J. C. and A. W. HARE--Guesses at

Truth.

CHRISTIAN. A Christian is God Almighty's gentlemin.

J. C. and A. W. Hare-liresses at Truth Look in, and see Christ's chosen saint

In triumph wear his Christ-like chain; No fear lest he should swerve or faint; * His life is Christ, his death is gain."

KELLE -SI. Leke.

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