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CHANCE,

CHARACTER.

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Quo teneam vultus mutantem
Protea nodo?

With what knot shall I hold this Proteus, who so often changes his countenance ? HORACE.

Momento mare vertitur, Eodem die ubi luserunt, navigia sorbentar.

In a moment the sea is convulsed and on the same day vessels are swallowed up where they lately sported on the waves.

JUVENAL. Nam multa præter spem scio multis bona

evenisse, At ego etiam qui speraverint, spem decepisse

niultos. For I know that many good things have happened to many, when least expected; and that many hopes have been disappointed.

PLAUTUS.
Est natura hominum novitatis avida.

Human nature is fond of novelty.
p.

PLINY THE ELDER. Nostra sine auxilio fugiunt bona. Carpite

florem. Our advantages fly away without aid. Pluck the flower.

9. OVID.

Corporis et fortunæ bonorum ut initium finis est. Omnia orta occidunt, et orta senescunt.

As the blessings of health and fortune have a beginning, so they must also find an end. Everything rises but to fall, and increases but to decay.

SALLUST. Non convalescit planta, quæ sæpe transfertur.

The plant, which is often transplanted, does not prosper.

SENECA. Corpora lente augescent, cito extingu. untur.

Bodies are slow of growth, but are rapid in their dissolution.

t. TACITUS. Multn dies variusque labor mutabilis ævi Retulit in melius: multos alterna revisens Lusit, et in solido rursus Fortuna locavit.

Time and the varying morements of changing years have bettered many things: and Fortune returning after having deserted many, has again placed them upon solid ground.

VIRGIL.

CHANGE. An id exploratum cuiqnam potest esse, quomodo sese habiturum sit corpus, non dico ad annum sed ad vesperam ?

Can anyone find out in what condition his body will be, I do not say a year hence, but this evening? b.

CICERO. Nihil est aptius ad delectationem lectoris quam temporum varietates fortunæque vicissitudines.

There is nothing better fitted to delight the reader than change of circumstances and varieties of fortune.

CICERO. Asperius nihil est humili cum surgit in altum.

Nothing is more annoying than a low man raised to a high position.

d. CLAUDIANUS.

Mobile mutatur semper cum principe vulgus.

The fickle populace always change with the prince. CLAUDIANUS.

Amphora cepit Institui ; currente rotâ cur urceus exit?

A vase is begun; why, as the wheel goes round, does it turn out a pitcher?

HORACE.
Diruit, ædificat, mutąt quadrata rotundis.

He pulls down, he builds up, he changes squares into circles.

g. HORACE. Non si male nunc et olim sic erit.

If matters go on badly now, they will not always be so.

h. HORACE.
Non sum qualis eram.

I am not what I once was.
i. HORACE.

Optat ephippia bos piger, optat arare caballus.

The lazy ox wishes for horse-trappings, and the steed wishes to plough.

j. HORACE.
Plerumque gratæ divitibus vices.

Change generally pleases the rich.
k. HORACE.

Quod petit spernit, repetit quod nuper omisit.

He despises what he sought; and he seeks that which he lately threw away.

1. HORACE.

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CHARACTER. Constans et lenis, ut res expostalet, esto.

Be firm or mild as the occasion may require.

Cato,

Servetur ad imum Qualis ab incepto processerit, et sibi constet.

Let the character as it began be preserved to the last; and let it be consistent with itself.

k. HORACE.

a.

Famæ damna majora, quam quæ estimari

possint. The injury done to character is greater than can be estimated.

1. Livy. Mortua cui vita est prope jam vivoque

videnti. Whose life is dead even while he lives and

sees.

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LUCRETIUS. Magnos liomines virtute metimur non fortunâ.

We measure great men by their character, not by their success.

n. NEPOS.

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Suus quoque attributus est error: Sed non videmus, manticæ quid in tergo est.

Every one has his faults: but we do not see the wallet on our own backs,

CATULLUS. Etiam illud adjungo, sæpius ad laudem atque virtutem naturam sine doctrinâ, quam sine naturâ valuisse doctrinam.

I add this also, that natural ability without education has oftener raised man to glory and virtue, than education without natural ability.

b. CICERO. Imago animi vultus est, indices oculi.

The countenance is the portrait of the soul, and the eyes mark its intentions.

CICERO. Importunitas autem, et inhumanitas omni ætati molesta est.

But a perverse temper and fretful disposition make any state of life unhappy.

d. CICERO.

Minime sibi quisque notus est, et difficil. lime de se quisque sentit.

Every one is least known to himself, and it is very difficult for a man to know himself.

CICERO. Quotus quisque philosophorum invenitur, qui sit ita moratus, ita animo ac vita constitutus, ut ratio postulat ?

How few philosophers there are whose habits, minds and lives are constituted as reason demands. s. CICERO.

Ut ignis in aquam conjectus, continuo restinguitur et refrigeratur, sic refervens falsum crimen in purissimam et castissimam vitam collatum, statim concidit et extinguitur.

As fire when thrown into water is cooled down and put out, so also a false accusation when brought against a man of the purest and holiest character, boils over and is at once dissipated, and vanishes. g.

CICERO. Falsus honor juvat et mendax infamia

terret, Quem nisi mendosum et mendacem?

Whom does false honor aid, and calumny deter, but the vicious and the liar?

h. HORACE. Integer vitae scelerisque purus Non eget Mauri jaculis neque arcu.

The man who is pure in life, and free from guilt needs not the aid of Moorish bows and darts.

i. HORACE. Paulum sepultæ distat inertia Celata virtus.

Excellence when concealed, differs but lit. tle from buried worthlessness.

j. HORACE.

1'.

Quod licet ingratum est; quod non licet

acrius urit. What is lawful is despised; what is unlawful is eagerly desired. p.

Ovid. Ut desint vires tamen est laudanda voluntas.

Though the power be wanting, yet the wish is praiseworthy. 9.

Ovid.
Video meliora proboque,
Deteriora sequor.

I see and approve better things, I follow the worse.

Ovid.

Intus et in jecore ægro Nascuntur domini.

Within thy morbid breast there spring up masters.

PERSIUS. Tecum habita, et noris quam sit tibi curta

supellex. Retire within thyself, and thou will discover how small a stock is there.

t. PERSIUS. Udum et molle lutum es: nunc, nunc pro

perandus et acri Fingendus sine fine rota.

Thou art moist and soft clay; thou must instantly be shaped by the glowing wheel.

PERSIUS.
Velle suum cuique, nec voto vivitur uno.

Each man has his own desires; all do not possess the same inclinations.

PERSIUS.

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