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A nickname a man may chance to wear out; but a system of calumny, pursued by & faction, may descend even to posterity. This principle has taken full effect on this state favorite. f. ISAAC DISRAELI — Amenities of Literuture. The First Jesuits in

England. There are calumnies against which even innocence loses courage. 9.

NAPOLEON. Be thou as chaste as ice, as pure as snow, thou shalt not escape calumny.

h. Hamlet. Act III. Sc. 1.

Calumny will sear Virtue itself ;-these shrugs, these hums, and

ha's. i. Winter's Tale. Act II. Sc. 1.

CARE.
Begone, dull Care, I prithee begone from me;
Begone, dull Care, thou and I shall never

agree.
Begone, old Care.

PLAYFORD's Musical Companion.
Care is no care, but rather a corrosive,
For things that are not to be remedied. •

p. Henry VI. Pt. I. Act III. Sc. 3. Care keeps his watch in every old man's eye, And where care lodges, sleep will never lie; But where unbruised youth with unstuff"d

brain Doth couch his limbs, there golden sleep

doth reign. 9. Romeo and Juliet, Act II. Sc. 3. He cannot long hold out these pangs; The incessant care and labour of his mind Hath wrought the mure, that should confine

it in, So thin, that life looks through and will

break out.

Henry IV. Pt. II. Act IV. Sc. 4. I am sure, care's an enemy to life.

Twelfth Night. Act I, Sc. 3. O polished perturbation! golden care ! That keep'st the ports of slumber open wide To many a watchful night.

t. Henry IV. Pt. II. Act IV. Sc. 4. Some must watch, while some must sleep; So runs the world away.

Hamlet. Act III. Sc. 2.
I could lie down like a tired child,
And weep away the life of care
Which I have borne, and yet must bear.
SHELLEY-Stanzas written in

Dejection, near Naples.

No might nor greatness in mortality
Can censure 'scape ; back-wounding calumny
The whitest virtue strikes.

j. Measure for Measure. Act III. Sc. 2. Virtue itself 'scapes not calumnious strokes.

k. Hamlet. Act I. Sc. 3.

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When me mean to build, We first survey the plot, then draw the model, And, then we see the figure of the house, Then must we rate the cost of the erection; Which if we find outweighs ability, What do we then, but draw anew the model In fewer offices, or, at least desist To build at all ?

d. Henry IV. Pt. II. Act I. Sc. 3.

Discouragement seizes us only when we can no longer count on chance. p. GEORGES SAND- Handsome Lawrence.

Ch. II.

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Chance will not do the work-chance sends

the breeze; But if the pilot slumber at the helm, The very wind that wafts us towards the port May dash us on the shelves. The steersman's

part Is vigilance, blow it rough or smooth. 9. SCOTT-- Fortunes of Nigel. Ch. XXII.

Old Play. Against ill chances, men are ever merry ; But heaviness foreruns the good event.

Henry IV. Pt. II. Act IV. Sc. 2. I shall show the cinders of my spirits Through the ashes of my chance.

Antony and Cleopatra. Act V. Sc. 2.

Safe bind, safe find. g. Thos. TUSSER— Five Hundred Points

of Good Husbandry.

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CEREMONY. Ceremony was but devis'd at first To set a gloss on faint deeds, hollow wel.

comes, Recanting goodness, sorry ere 'tis shown.

h. Timon of Athens. Act. I. Sc. 2.

And grasps the skirts of happy chance,
And breasts the blows of circumstance.

t. TENNYSON-- In Memoriam. Pt. LXIII.

O ceremony, show me but thy worth ! What is thy soul of adoration ? Art thou aught else but place, degree, and

form, Creating awe and fear in other men ?

i. Henry V. Act IV. Sc. 1.

Naught venture, naught have. THOS. TUSSER-Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry. October's

Extract. Chance is a word void of sense; nothing can exist without a cause. V.

VOLTAIRE-- A Philosophical Dictionary.

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Like the race of leaves Is that of humankind. Upon the ground The winds strew one year's leaves ; the

sprouting grove Puts forth another brood, that shoot and

grow
In the spring season. So it is with man:
One generatii n grows while one decays.
BRYANT'S Homer's Iliad.

Bk. VI. Line 186. All that's bright must fade,

The brightest still the sweetest;
All that's sweet was made,
But to be lost when sweetest.

b. MOORE--AU That's Bright Must Fade. Perhaps it may turn out a song, Perhaps turn out a sermon.

c. BURNS-- Epistle to a Young Friend. Full from the fount of joy's delicious springs Some bitter o'er the flowers its bubbling

venom Alings. d. BYRON-Childe Harold. Canto I.

St. 82.

Passing away” is written on the world, and all the world contains.

Mrs. HEMANS-Passing Away. Gather ye rose-buds while ye may,

Old Time is still a-flying, And this same flower, that smiles to-day, To-morrow will be dying. HERRICK-- To the Virgins to make much

of Time. Now stamped with the image of Good Queen

Bess,
And now of a Bloody Mary.

HOOD-- Miss Kilmansegg. Her Moral. As the rolling stone gathers no moss, so the roving heart gathers no affections. p. Mrs. JAMESON--Studies. Detached

Thoughts.

0.

Time fleeth on,
Youth soon is gone,

Naught earthly may abide ;
Life seemeth fast,
But may not last, --

It runs as runs the tide. 9. LELAND--Many in One. Pt. II. St. 21.

All things must change To something new, to something strange.

LONGFELLOW--Kéramos. Line 32.

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Shrine of the mighty ! can it be
That this is all remains of thee?

BYRON- The Gaiour. Line 106.

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To-day is not yesterday : we ourselves change; how can our Works and Thoughts, if they are always to be the fittest, continue always the same? Change, indeed, is painful; yet ever needful; and if Memory have its force and worth, so also has hope. 9. CARLYLE- Essays. Characteristics.

Sancho Panza am I, unless I was changed in the cradle. h. CERVANTES Don Quixote. Pt. II.

Bk. II. Ch. XIII.

Nothing that is can pause or stay; The moon will wax, the inoon will wane, The mist and cloud will turn to rain, The rain to mist and cloud again,

To-morrow be to-day. t. LONGFELLOW– Kéramos. Line 34

.

66

V.

Still ending, and beginning still.
COWPEB— The Task. Bk. III.

Line 627.
Variety 's the very spice of life,
That gives it all its favor.
). COWPER- The Task. Bk. II.

The Timepiece, I., 606. Heaven gave him all at once; then snatched

away, Ere mortals all his beauties could survey ; Just like the flower that buds and withers in

a day. k. DRYDEN – On the Death of Amyntas.

Everything lives, flourishes, and decays : everything dies, but nothing is lost : for the great principle of life only changes its form, and the destruction of one generation is the vivification of the next. 1 Good, The Book of Nature. Series I.

Lecture VIII.

Do not think that years leave us and find us the same! OWEN MEREDITH-Lucile. Pt. II.

Canto II. St. 3. Weary the cloud falleth out of the sky,

Dreary the leaf lieth low. All things must come to the earth by and by, Out of which all things grow. OWEN MEREDITH--The Wanderer. Earth's Havings. Bk. III.

This world Is full of change, change, change, --nothing

but change!

D. M. MULOCK-Immutable.
My merry, merry, merry roundelay
Concludes with Cupid's curse :
They that do change old love for new,
Pray gods, they change for worse !

GEORGE PEELE--Cupid's Curse;
From the Ar

ignment of Paris.

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CHANGE.

CHANGE.

Alas! in truth, the man but chang'd his

mind, Perhaps was sick, in love, or had not dined. a. POPE--Moral Essays. Ep. I.

Line 127.

Extremes in nature equal good produce, Extremes in man concur to general use. b. POPE-- Moral Essays. Ep. III.

Line 161.

From the mid-most the nutation spreads
Round and more round, o'er all the sea of

heads.
POPE--The Dunciad. Bk. II.

Line 410.

That we would do, We should do when we would ; for this

wouldchanges, And hath abatements and delays as many, As there are tongues, are hands, are acci.

dents ; And then this should " is like a spend

thrift's sigh, That hurts by easing.

1. Hamlet. Act IV. Sc. 7. The love of wicked friends converts to fear ; That fear, to hate ; and hate turns one or both, To worthy danger, and deserved death.

Richard 11. Act V. Sc. 1. This is the state of man ; To-day he puts

forth The tender leaves of hope, to-morrow blog

soms, And bears his blushing honours thick upon

him.

Henry VIII. Act III. Sc. 2. This world is not for aye; nor'tis not strange, That even our loves should with our fortunes

change.

Hamlet. Act III. Sc. 2.

c.

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Manners with Fortunes, Humours turn with

Climes,
Tenets with Books, and Principles with

Times.
d. POPE--Moral Essays. Ep. I.

Line 172.
See dying vegetables life sustain,
See life dissolving vegetate again ;
All forms that perish other forms supply ;
(By turns we catch the vital breath, and die.)
POPE--Essay on Man. Ep. III.

Line 15. Hope and fear alternate chase Our course through life's uncertain race.

SCOTT-- Rokeby. Canto VI. St. 2. When change itself can give no more, 'Tis easy to be true. g. Sir Chas. SEDLEY--Reasons for

Constancy.
All things that we ordained festival,
Turn from their office to black funeral :
Our instruments, to melancholy bells :
Our wedding cheer, to a sad burial feast;
Our solemn hymns to sullen dirges change ;
Our bridal flowers serve for a buried corse,
And all things change them to the contrary.

h. Romeo and Juliet. Act IV. Sc. 5.
Full fathom five thy father lies ;
Of his bones are coral made;
Those are pearls that were his eyes :
Nothing of him that doth fade,
But doth suffer a sea-change
Into something rich and strange.
i. Tempest. Act I. Sc. 2.

I am not so nice,
To change true rules for odd inventions.

) Taming of the Shrelo. Act III. Sc. 1. Our revels now are ended : these our actors, As I foretold you, were all spirits, and Are melted into air, into thin air ; And, like the baseless fabric of this vision, The cloud-capp'd towers, the gorgeous pal

aces, The solemn temples, the great globe itself, Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve ; And, like this insubstantial pageant faded, Leave not a rack behind.

k. Tempest. Act IV. Sc. 1.

Thou hast describ'd A hot friend cooling: Ever note, Lucilius, When love begins to sicken and decay, It useth an enforced ceremony. p.

Julius Cæsar. Act IV. Sc. 2. When we were happy, we had other names. 9.

King John. Act V. Sc. 4.
Men must reap the things they sow,
Force from force must ever tlow,
Or worse ; but 'tis a bitter woe
That love or reason cannot change.
SHELLEY-Lines Written among the

Enganean Hills. Line 232. The loppéd tree in time may grow again, Most naked plants renew both fruit and

flower, The sorriest wight may find release from

pain, The driest soil suck in some moistening

shower; Time goes by turns, and chances change by

course, From foul to fair, from better hap to worse.

SOUTHWELL-- Time Go by Turns. His honour rooted in dishonour stood, And faith unfaithful kept him falsely true. t. TENNYSON. Idyls of the King. Elaine.

Line 885. Life is arched with changing skies:

Rarely are they what they seem: Children we of smiles and sighsMuch we know but more we dream.

WILLIAM WINTER--Light and Shadow. As high as we have mounted in delight In our dejection do we sink as low. WORDSWORTH--Resolution and

Independence. Si. 4.

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