The Writings of Mark Twain: The adventures of Huckleberry Finn

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Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1899

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Contents

I
15
II
20
III
28
IV
33
V
38
VI
44
VII
53
VIII
61
XXIII
202
XXIV
209
XXV
217
XXVI
226
XXVII
236
XXVIII
244
XXIX
256
XXX
268

IX
75
X
80
XI
85
XII
94
XIII
103
XIV
110
XV
116
XVI
124
XVII
135
XVIII
146
XIX
161
XX
172
XXI
183
XXII
195
XXXI
273
XXXII
284
XXXIII
292
XXXIV
301
XXXV
308
XXXVI
317
XXXVII
324
XXXVIII
332
XXXIX
340
XL
347
XLI
355
XLII
363
XLIII
373

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Page 15 - You don't know about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; but that ain't no matter. That book was made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly.
Page iii - NOTICE Persons attempting to find a motive in this narrative will be prosecuted; persons attempting to find a moral in it will be banished; persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot.
Page 114 - Well, then, why ain't it natural and right for a Frenchman to talk different from us? You answer me that." "Is a cat a man, Huck?" "No." "Well, den, dey ain't no sense in a cat talkin' like a man. Is a cow a man?— er is a cow a cat?
Page 196 - ... stage full of men, in the day-time, and robbed the lot. Your newspapers call you a brave people so much that you think you are braver than any other people— whereas you're just as brave, and no braver. Why don't your juries hang murderers? Because they're afraid the man's friends will shoot them in the back, in the dark— and it's just what they would do.
Page 161 - Two or three days and nights went by; I reckon I might say they swum by, they slid along so quiet and smooth and lovely. Here is the way we put in the time. It was a monstrous big river down there— sometimes a mile and a half wide...
Page 130 - I'd feel just the same way I do now. Well, then, says I, what's the use you learning to do right when it's troublesome to do right and ain't no trouble to do wrong, and the wages is just the same? I was stuck. I couldn't answer that. So I reckoned I wouldn't bother no more about it, but after this always do whichever come handiest at the time.
Page 128 - I didn't answer up prompt. I tried to, but the words wouldn't come. I tried for a second or two to brace up and out with it, but I warn't man enough — hadn't the spunk of a rabbit. I see I was weakening; so I just give up trying, and up and says: "He's white.
Page 147 - He was as kind as he could be — you could feel that, you know, and so you had confidence. Sometimes he smiled, and it was good to see; but when he straightened himself up like a libertypole, and the lightning begun to flicker out from under his eyebrows you wanted to climb a tree first, and find out what the matter was afterwards.
Page 130 - I got aboard the raft, feeling bad and low, because I knowed very well I had done wrong, and I see it warn't no use for me to try to learn to do right; a body that don't get started right - when he's little, ain't got no show— when the pinch comes there ain't nothing to back him up and keep him to his work, and so he gets beat. Then I thought a minute, and says to myself, hold on,— s'pose you'd- a done right and give Jim up; would you felt better than what you do now?
Page 162 - ... by and by you could see a streak on the water which you know by the look of the streak that there's a snag there in a swift current which breaks on it and makes that streak look that way...

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