Page images
PDF
EPUB

So, taken off to the station, she
Was charged with due formality-
But the vaulted cell was tenanted too
By her grim friend Death, the sole and true,

Who disposed of the case, without delay,
In his own so merciful, summary way;
And, in place of hard labour, gave the boon
Of a rest which could hardly come too soon,

*

56 Fitful fever” of life o'ercast !
Poor downward face! Upturned at last,
Let us hope, to the dawn of a nightless day-
Even your hot tears may be wiped away.

(By permission of the Author.)

THE MARRIAGE OF THE PRINCESS ROYAL.

HOW MRS, GRIDDLES WENT TO SEE THE ILLUMINATIONS,

E. L. BLANCHARD,

WELL, I didn't suspect, when I last sat down to my

tea, for which I am a stickler, Which I buys close at hand, at a shop in the Strand,

where they know I am very partick'lar, That the Lord Mayor's Day, which I saw, I may say, ,

in a style that I cries out shame of, With all that I heerd, would have ever appeared in print, for

you

folks to make game of; But it's just like you, whatever we do, your own ends

you are still bent solely onI just wish that, instead of Martha Griddles, you had

to deal with Looey Napoleon,

If this, you confess, is the liberty of the press, why, all

I can say is, drat it ! I should like once to see you a-pressing of me-only

just let me catch you at it. But that, I'm aware, isn't here nor there, so to come to

the point which you seek about, And that's of the sight of last Monday night-well, I

say that it's nothing to speak about, Not but I bless the Royal Princess, and the Prince who

has took for his bride, her, And not but I mean her Majesty the Queen, and the

rest of the royal family beside her ; And I truly hope a good husband he'll make, and not

be like those indiwiddles Who are all nice men till they marry, and then turn

rumbustical, just like Griddles, Who came to a latch-key and joined a club, where he's

always, he said, the first man as stirs, But 'twas often near four when he opened the door, and

came lumbering upstairs by the banisters. So I hope, poor dear, that her husband will steer clear

of clubs, whether social or wooden, For we've given a good round sum for the Prince, and

she ought to have got a good 'un. Well, as I was a-saying, last Saturday night, I was

dealing at Clarke's, which it closer is, For I'd just been doing my marketing then, and I'd got

to get in my groceries, When who should come in but old Mrs. Jones, to buy

in her regular quantum, And treat herself to some cough drops, beside, which,

thank Heaven, I don't want 'em, And

“Mrs. Griddles,” says she, “if this isn't the curiousest thing to tell, As ever I heerd on, to see you here, and I'd just been

giving you a ring at the bell— And this makes out my dream, which I had last night,

and which now has come true as fate, By the likes of which I knew a surprise would come

me soon or late;

says she,

And seeing you wasn't at home, I thought, as you left

the light burning behind you, You might have gone, p'raps, for the mangling things,

when, lo and behold, here I find you.' "Well," says I, "Mrs. Jones, it ain't to be thought that

I'm always at home for a fixture" And I then asked the shopman, who hands me the

black, for an ounce of his five-shilling mixture; " I goes out sometimes," says I, “ as you know—which,"

says I, “you ought well to remember." “ To be sure,” says she, “ there's the Lord Mayor's Day,

which happened last ninth of November;" Then what did we do, but both on us two kept on so

a-laughing and sniggering, That the grocer he looks right up from his books, and says

that it bothers his figgering. Well, at last Mrs. Jones, in mysterious tones, says, “ You

know, I suppose, that the wooings Are going to take place on the Monday next, and the

marriage and all such fine doings ?" “What marriage ?" says I. What, Miss Biggs down the

court-has she made up her mind to the butcher ?" Why, the Princess Royal,” says she, “in course, and

the Prince Frederick William of Proocher. But you never read one of the papers, I know, so it's

nat’ral in you for to doubt it, And if the whole world went to pieces to day, you'd to

morrow know nuffin about it. But there's going to be such wonderful sights, and such

splendid illuminations, That in all our born days, or in all our born nights, we

never saw such celebrations." “Well,” says I, “Mrs. Jones, if you mean for to say,

this to beat all the rest by chalks is, Though the only thing that I care to go out to see is

the old Guy Fawkeses ; I don't mind making of one, and doing whatever may

seem to be proper,

66

If this, you confess, is the liberty of the press, why, all

I can say is, drat it! I should like once to see you a-pressing of me-only

just let me catch you at it. But that, I'm aware, isn't here nor there, so to come to

the point which you seek about, And that's of the sight of last Monday night-well, I

say that it's nothing to speak about, Vot but I bless the Royal Princess, and the Prince who

has took for his bride, her, And not but I mean her Majesty the Queen, and the

rest of the royal family beside her; And I truly hope a good husband he'll make, and not

be like those indiwiddles Who are all nice men till they marry, and then turn

rumbustical, just like Griddles, Who came to a latch-key and joined a club, where he's

always, he said, the first man as stirs, But 'twas often near four when he opened the door, and

came lumbering upstairs by the banisters. So I hope, poor dear, that her husband will steer clear

of clubs, whether social or wooden, For we've given a good round sum for the Prince, and

she ought to have got a good 'un. Well, as I was a-saying, last Saturday night, I was

dealing at Clarke's, which it closer is, For I'd just been doing my marketing then, and I'd got

to get in my groceries, When who should come in but old Mrs. Jones, to buy

in her regular quantum, And treat herself to some cough drops, beside, which,

thank Heaven, I don't want 'em, And says she, “Mrs. Griddles," says she, “if this isn't

the curiousest thing to tell, As ever I heerd on, to see you here, and I'd just been

giving you a ring at the bellAnd this makes out my dream, which I had last night,

and which now has come true as fate, By the likes of which I knew a surprise would come to

me soon or late;

And seeing you wasn't at home, I thought, as you left

the light burning behind you, You might have gone, praps, for the mangling things,

when, lo and behold, here I find you." "Well," says I, “Mrs. Jones, it ain't to be thought that

I'm always at home for a fixture” And I then asked the shopman, who hands me the

black, for an ounce of his five-shilling mixture; “ I goes out sometimes," says I," as you know—which,"

says I, “you ought well to remember." “ To be sure," says she, “there's the Lord Mayor's Day,

which happened last ninth of November;" Then what did we do, but both on us two kept on so

a-laughing and sniggering, That the grocer he looks right up from his books, and says

that it bothers his figgering. Well, at last Mrs. Jones, in mysterious tones, says, “ You

know, I suppose, that the wooings Are going to take place on the Monday next, and the

marriage and all such fine doings ?'' “What marriage ?" says I. “What, Miss Biggs down the

court—has she made up her mind to the butcher ?" • Why, the Princess Royal,” says she, “in course, and

the Prince Frederick William of Proocher. But you never read one of the papers, I know, so it's

nat'ral in you for to doubt it, And if the whole world went to pieces to day, you'd to

morrow know nuffin about it. But there's going to be such wonderful sights, and such

splendid illuminations, That in all our born days, or in all our born nights, we

never saw such celebrations." “Well,” says I, “Mrs. Jones, if you mean for to say,

this to beat all the rest by chalks is, Though the only thing that I care to go out to see is

the old Guy Fawkeses ; I don't mind making of one, and doing whatever may

seem to be proper,

« PreviousContinue »