Barbarism and Religion: Volume 1, The Enlightenments of Edward Gibbon, 17371764

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Cambridge University Press, 1999 M10 7
'Barbarism and Religion' - Edward Gibbon's own phrase - is the title of an acclaimed sequence of works by John Pocock designed to situate Gibbon, and his Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, in a series of contexts in the history of eighteenth-century Europe. This is a major intervention from one of the world's leading historians of ideas, challenging the notion of any one 'Enlightenment' and positing instead a plurality of enlightenments, of which the English was one. In this first volume, The Enlightenments of Edward Gibbon, John Pocock follows Gibbon through his youthful exile in Switzerland and his criticisms of the Encyclopédie, and traces the growth of his historical interests down to the conception of the Decline and Fall itself.
 

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Contents

Putney Oxford and the question of English Enlightenment
13
Lausanne and the Arminian Enlightenment
50
method unbelief
72
The Hampshire militia and the problems of modernity
94
erudition and the search for a narrative
121
The politics of scholarship in French and English
137
Erudition and Enlightenment in the Académie
152
of history
169
history
208
THE JOURNEY TOWARDS
255
The return to Lausanne and the pursuit of erudition
261
The journey to Rome and the transformation of intentions
275
Gibbon and the rhythm that was different
292
List of references
309
Index
324
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Born in London and brought up in Christchurch, New Zealand, J. G. A. Pocock was educated at the Universities of Canterbury and Cambridge, and was for many years (1974-1994) Professor of History at The Johns Hopkins University. His many seminal works on intellectual history include The Ancient Constitution and the Feudal Law (1957, Second Edition 1987), Politics, Language and Time (1971), The Machiavellian Moment (1975), and Virtue, Commerce and History (1985). He has also edited The Political Works of James Harrington (1977) and Burke's Reflections on the Revolution in France (1987), as well as the collaborative study The Varieties of British Political Thought (1995). A Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy and of the Royal Historical Society, Professor Pocock is also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the American Philosophical Society.

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