Kaleidoscopiana Wiltoniensia, Or, a Literary, Political, and Moral View of the County of Wilts: During the Contested Election for Its Representation, in June 1818, Between Paul Methuen, Esq., William Long Wellesley, Esq., and John Benett, Esq. when the Two Former Gentlemen Were Returned; Containing the Whole of the Advertisements, Letters, Speeches, Squibs, and Songs, that Have Been Published During the Election

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J. Brettell, ... sold by J. Ebers, ... C. Fellows, Salisbury; and all the principal booksellers throughout the county of Wilts., 1818 - 406 pages
 

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Wiltshire Tracts Volume 4 part 1 / 1818 / 406 pages

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1818 / Number 1 in Wiltshire Tracts volume 4 / 406 pages

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Page 302 - Be copy now to men of grosser blood, And teach them how to war. And you, good yeomen, Whose limbs were made in England, show us here The mettle of your pasture; let us swear That you are worth your breeding, which I doubt not; For there is none of you so mean and base, ) That hath not noble lustre in your eyes. I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips, Straining upon the start. The game's afoot! Follow your spirit, and upon this charge Cry, "God for Harry! England and Saint George!
Page 290 - And that which should accompany old age, As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends, I must not look to have ; but, in their stead, Curses, not loud but deep, mouth-honour, breath, Which the poor heart would fain deny, and dare not.
Page 12 - It is not virtue, wisdom, valour, wit, Strength, comeliness of shape, or amplest merit, That woman's love can win, or long inherit ; But what it is, hard is to say, Harder to hit, Which way soever men refer it, Much like thy riddle, Samson, in one day Or seven, though one should musing sit.
Page 302 - Old men forget, yet shall not all forget, But they'll remember, with advantages, What feats they did that day.
Page 302 - This day is called the Feast of Crispian. He that outlives this day, and comes safe home, Will stand a-tiptoe when this day is named And rouse him at the name of Crispian. He that shall live this day, and see old age, Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours And say, 'To-morrow is Saint Crispian.' Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars, [And say, "These wounds I had on Crispin's day...
Page 50 - A whip for the horse, a bridle for the ass, and a rod for the fool's back.
Page 310 - Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed, And batten on this moor? Ha!- have you eyes? You cannot call it love; for at your age The hey-day in the blood is tame, it's humble, And waits upon the judgment: and what judgment Would step from this to this?
Page 398 - ... Earl Percy's sake.' This vow full well the king performed After at Humbledown ; In one day fifty knights were slain, With lords of high renown : And of the rest, of small account, Did many hundreds die ; Thus endeth the hunting of Chevy-Chase, Made by the Earl Percy. God save the king, and bless this land, With plenty, joy, and peace ; And grant, henceforth, that foul debate 'Twixt noblemen may cease...
Page 233 - An't please your honour," quoth the peasant: "This same dessert is not so pleasant: Give me again my hollow tree, .A crust of bread, and liberty !
Page 208 - And own myself a man: to see our senators Cheat the deluded people with a shew Of liberty, which yet they ne'er must taste of; They say, by them our hands are free from fetters, Yet whom they please they lay in basest bonds; Bring whom they please to infamy and sorrow ; Drive us like...

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