Samuel Johnson

Front Cover
Macmillan, 1882 - 195 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 142 - On that best portion of a good man's life, His little, nameless, unremembered acts Of kindness and of love.
Page 45 - Is not a patron, my Lord, one who looks with unconcern on a man struggling for life in the water, and when he has reached ground encumbers him with help...
Page 46 - Having carried on my work thus far with so little obligation to any favourer of learning, I shall not be disappointed though I should conclude it, if less be possible, with less; for I have been long wakened from that dream of hope, in which I once boasted myself with so much exultation, My Lord, Your Lordship's most humble Most obedient servant, SAM. JOHNSON.
Page 69 - You are a philosopher, Dr. Johnson. I have tried too in my time to be a philosopher; but, I don't know how, cheerfulness was always breaking in.
Page 45 - I had done all that I could, and no man is well pleased to have his all neglected, be it ever so little. Seven years, My Lord, have now passed since I waited in your outward rooms or was repulsed from your door...
Page 13 - At Edial, near Lichfield, in Staffordshire, young gentlemen are boarded and taught the Latin and Greek languages, by SAMUEL JOHNSON.
Page 44 - My Lord, I have been lately informed, by the proprietor of The World, that two papers, in which my Dictionary is recommended to the public, were written by your Lordship.
Page 122 - Knowledge is of two kinds. We know a subject ourselves, or we know where we can find information upon it.
Page 188 - In this poem there is no nature, for there is no truth ; there is no art, for there is nothing new. Its form is that of a pastoral -easy, vulgar, and therefore disgusting ; whatever images it can supply are long ago exhausted ; and its inherent improbability always forces dissatisfaction on the mind.
Page 80 - By inscribing this slight performance to you, I do not mean so much to compliment you as myself. It may do me some honour to inform the public, that I have lived many years in intimacy with you. It may serve the interests of mankind also to inform them, that the greatest wit may be found in a character, without impairing the most unaffected piety.

Bibliographic information