A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

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Harper and brothers, 1889 - 433 pages
 

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I very like last pages, especially P.S. by M.T. It's very cool. The novel is good enough to read.

Contents

I
1
II
9
III
12
IV
20
V
28
VI
32
VII
39
VIII
48
XXIII
185
XXIV
199
XXV
210
XXVI
224
XXVII
240
XXVIII
253
XXIX
264
XXX
270

IX
56
X
64
XI
71
XII
77
XIII
87
XIV
93
XV
104
XVI
109
XVII
120
XVIII
129
XIX
141
XX
155
XXI
160
XXII
169
XXXI
278
XXXII
291
XXXIII
300
XXXIV
309
XXXV
324
XXXVI
339
XXXVII
348
XXXVIII
353
XXXIX
363
XL
367
XLI
380
XLII
390
XLIII
411
XLIV
428

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Page 101 - All power is inherent in the people, and all free governments are founded on their authority and instituted for their peace, safety, and happiness.
Page 195 - Whenever the literary German dives into a sentence, that is the last you are going to see of him till he emerges on the other side of his Atlantic with his verb in his mouth.
Page 115 - Just so and brake his back." "and lightly Sir Gawaine rose upon his feet and pulled out his sword, and dressed him toward Sir Marhaus on foot, and therewith either came unto other eagerly, and smote together with their swords, that their shields flew in cantels, and they bruised their helms and their hauberks, and wounded either other. But Sir Gawaine, fro it passed nine of the clock, waxed by the space of three hours ever stronger and stronger, and thrice his might was increased. All this...
Page 164 - For it could not help bringing up the unget-aroundable fact that, all gentle cant and philosophizing to the contrary notwithstanding, no people in the world ever did achieve their freedom by goody-goody talk and moral suasion: it being immutable law that all revolutions that will succeed must begin in blood, whatever may answer afterward. If history teaches anything, it teaches that. What this folk needed, then, was a Reign of Terror and a guillotine, and I was the wrong man for them.
Page 290 - Yes, there is plenty good enough material for a republic in the most degraded people that ever existed even the Russians; plenty of manhood in them even in the Germans if one could but force it out of its timid and suspicious privacy, to overthrow and trample in the mud any throne that ever was set up and any nobility that ever supported it.
Page 381 - Slavery was dead and gone; all men were equal before the law; taxation had been equalized. The telegraph, the telephone, the phonograph, the type-writer, the sewing machine, and all the thousand willing and handy servants of steam and electricity were working their way into favor.
Page 417 - The dynamite had dug a ditch more than a hundred feet wide, all around us, and cast up an embankment some twenty-five feet high on both borders of it. As to destruction of life, it was amazing. Moreover, it was beyond estimate. Of course we could not count the dead, because they did not exist as individuals, but merely as homogeneous protoplasm, with alloys of iron and buttons.
Page 268 - There are wise people who talk ever so knowingly and complacently about " the working classes," and satisfy themselves that a day's hard intellectual work is very much harder than a day's hard manual toil, and is righteously entitled to much bigger pay. Why, they really think that, you know, because they know all about the one, but haven't tried the other.
Page 401 - Arthur wood wroth out of measure, when he saw his people so slain from him. Then the king looked about him, and then was he ware, of all his host and of all his good knights, .were left no more on live but two knights ; that one was Sir Lucan the Butler, and his brother Sir Bedivere, and they were full sore wounded. Jesu mercy...
Page 268 - ... in his hand who sits in the midst of a great orchestra with the ebbing and flowing tides of divine sound washing over him why, certainly, he is at work, if you wish to call it that, but lord, it's a sarcasm just the same. The law of work does seem utterly unfair...

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