The Batchelor: Or Speculations of Jeoffry Wagstaffe, Esq; ...

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James Hoey, junior, 1769
 

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Page 59 - It happened one day, as a stout and honest mastiff, that guarded the village where he lived against thieves and robbers, was very gravely walking with one of his puppies by his side, all the little dogs in the street gathered about him, and barked at him. The little...
Page 196 - Each person there may drink, and fill As much, or little, as he will, Exempted from the bedlam-rules Of roaring prodigals and fools : Whether, in merry mood or whim He takes a bumper to the brim, Or, better pleas'd to let it pass, Grows mellow with a scanty glass. Nor this man's house, nor that's estate Becomes the subject of debate : Nor whether Lepos, the buffoon...
Page 286 - Brutes find out where their talents lie: A bear will not attempt to fly; A founder'd horse will oft debate, Before he tries a five-barr'd gate; A dog by instinct turns aside, Who sees the ditch too deep and wide. But man we find the only creature Who, led by Folly, combats Nature; Who, when she loudly cries, Forbear, With obstinacy fixes there; And, where his genius least inclines, Absurdly bends his whole designs.
Page 59 - ... mastiff, that guarded the village where he lived against thieves and robbers, was very gravely walking with one of his puppies by his side, all the little dogs in the street gathered about him, and barked at him. The little puppy was so offended at this affront done to his sire, that he asked him why he would not fall upon them and tear them to pieces ? To which the sire answered, with great composure of mind, " If there were no curs, I should be no mastiff.
Page 25 - Tis the divinity that ftirs within us ; 'Tis heaven itfelf, that points out an hereafter, And intimates eternity to man. Eternity ! thou pleafing, dreadful thought ! Through what variety of untry'd being, Through what new fcenes and changes muft we pafs ! The wide, th' unbounded profpeft, lies before me ; But fhadows, clouds, and darknefs, reft upon it.
Page 24 - And every soul is fill'd with equal flame; As much as earthy limbs, and gross allay Of mortal members, subject to decay, Blunt not the beams of heav'n and edge of day. From this coarse mixture of terrestrial parts, Desire and fear by turns possess their hearts, And grief, and joy; nor can the groveling mind, In the dark dungeon of the limbs confin'd, Assert the native skies, or own its heav'nly kind: Nor death itself can wholly wash their stains; But long-contracted filth ev'n in the soul remains.
Page 264 - I cannot say. The Wagstaffs are a merry, thoughtless sort of people, who have always been opinionated of their own wit; they have turned themselves mostly to poetry. This is the most numerous branch of our family, and the poorest. The Quarterstaffs are most of them prize-fighters or deer-stealers; there have been so many of them hanged lately that there are very few of that branch of our family left. The...
Page 237 - Behold me blam'ekfs bard, how fond of peace / But he who hurts me (nay, I will be heard) Had better take a lion by the beard; His eyesfoall weep the folly of his tongue, By laughing crouds in rueful ballad fung.
Page 63 - A ball of new-dropt horfe's dung, Mingling with apples in the throng, Said to the pippin plump and prim, " See, brother, how we apples fwim.
Page 141 - The poor were wife, who, by the rich opprefs'd, Withdrew, and fought a facred place of reft. Once they did well, to free themfelves from fcorn; But had done better never to return. Rarely they rife by virtue's aid, who lie Plung'd in the depth of helplefs poverty.

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