Bell's Classical Arrangement of Fugitive Poetry ..., Volumes 16-18

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John Bell, 1794
 

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Page 46 - In forest, brake, or den, As beasts excel cold rocks and brambles rude ; Men, who their duties know, But know their rights, and, knowing, dare maintain, Prevent the long-aimed blow, And crush the tyrant while they rend the chain : These constitute a State, And sovereign Law, that State's collected will O'er thrones and globes elate, Sits Empress, crowning good, repressing ill.
Page 47 - Prevent the long-aimed blow, And crush the tyrant while they rend the chain. These constitute a state; And sovereign Law, that state's collected will, O'er thrones and globes elate Sits empress, crowning good, repressing ill ; Smit by her sacred frown, The fiend, Discretion, like a vapour sinks, And e'en the all-dazzling crown Hides his faint rays, and at her bidding shrinks.
Page 72 - Till on some neighbouring mountain's brow He stops, and turns his eyes below ; There, melting at the well-known view, Drops a last tear, and bids adieu : So I, thus doom'd from thee to part, Gay Queen of Fancy, and of Art, Reluctant move with doubtful mind, Oft stop and often look behind. Companion of my tender age...
Page 72 - THE .LAWYER'S FAREWELL TO HIS MUSE. As, by some tyrant's stern command, A wretch forsakes his native land, In foreign climes condemn'd to roam An endless exile from his home...
Page 47 - O'er thrones and globes elate Sits empress, crowning good, repressing ill. Smit by her sacred frown, The fiend, Dissension, like a vapor sinks ; And e'en the all-dazzling crown Hides his faint rays, and at her bidding shrinks; Such was this heaven-loved isle, Than Lesbos fairer and the Cretan shore ! No more shall freedom smile ? Shall Britons languish, and be men no more ? Since all must life resign, Those sweet rewards which decorate the brave 'Tis folly to decline, And steal inglorious to the...
Page 29 - He sung, and hell consented To hear the poet's prayer : Stern Proserpine relented, And gave him back the fair : Thus song could prevail O'er death, and o'er hell, A conquest how hard, and how glorious ! Tho' fate had fast bound her With Styx nine times round her, Yet music and love were victorious.
Page 75 - Then welcome business, welcome strife, Welcome the cares, the thorns of life ; The visage wan, the purblind sight, The toil by day, the lamp at night, The tedious forms, the solemn prate, The pert dispute, the dull debate, The drowsy bench, the babbling Hall, For thee, fair Justice, welcome all...
Page 26 - The deep, majestic, solemn organs blow. Hark! the numbers soft and clear Gently steal upon the ear ; Now louder, and yet louder rise, And fill with spreading sounds the skies...
Page 46 - What constitutes a State? Not high-raised battlement or labored mound, Thick wall or moated gate; Not cities proud, with spires and turrets crowned; Not bays and broad-armed ports, Where, laughing at the storm, rich navies ride; Not starred and spangled courts, Where low-browed baseness wafts perfume to pride. No: MEN, high-minded MEN...
Page 26 - ON ST CECILIA'S DAY, MDCOVIH. i. DESCEND, ye Nine! descend and sing ; The breathing instruments inspire, Wake into voice each silent string, And sweep the sounding lyre! In a sadly-pleasing strain Let the warbling lute complain : Let the loud trumpet sound, Till the roofs all around The shrill echoes rebound ; While in more lengthen'd notes and slow, The deep, majestic, solemn organs blow.

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