Modern Political Philosophy

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M.E. Sharpe, 1999 M06 18
An introduction to the topics and issues in political philosophy, from the Enlightenment to Postmodernism. The author presents both the historical background of, and a systematic discussion of contemporary issues relating to the major traditions within political philosophy.

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Modern political philosophy

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True to its title, this relatively brief but well-written and comprehensive book begins with the American Revolution and the theory of natural rights. From there, Hudelson (philosophy, Univ. of ... Read full review

Contents

IV
3
V
18
VI
30
VII
44
VIII
59
IX
71
X
88
XI
101
XII
119
XIII
137
XIV
153
XV
155
XVI
163
XVII
169
XVIII
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Page 51 - The bourgeoisie, during its rule of scarce one hundred years, has created more massive and more colossal productive forces than have all preceding generations together.
Page 46 - Though the earth, and all inferior creatures, be common to all men, yet every man has a property in his own person: this nobody has any right to but himself. The labour of his body, and the work of his hands, we may say, are properly his.
Page 50 - Neither was there any among them that lacked: for as many as were possessors of lands or houses sold them, and brought the prices of the things that were sold, and laid them down at the apostles...
Page 50 - Now the company of those who believed were of one heart and soul, and no one said that any of the things which he possessed was his own, but they had everything in common.
Page 47 - The labour of his body and the work of his hands we may say are properly his. Whatsoever, then, he removes out of the state that nature hath provided and left it in, he hath mixed his labour with, and joined to it something that is his own, and thereby makes it his property.
Page 36 - That principle is, that the sole end for which mankind are warranted, individually or collectively, in interfering with the liberty of action of any of their number, is self-protection.
Page 36 - I forego any advantage which could be derived to my argument from the idea of abstract right, as a thing independent of utility. I regard utility as the ultimate appeal on all ethical questions ; but it must be utility in the largest sense, grounded on the permanent interests of man as a progressive being.
Page 15 - This part of knowledge is irresistible, and like bright sunshine forces itself immediately to be perceived, as soon as ever the mind turns its view that way; and leaves no room for hesitation, doubt, or examination, but the mind is presently filled with the clear light of it.

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