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Spencer's Synthetic Philosophy.

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(1.) FIRST PRINCIPLES

I. THE UNKNOWABLE.

II. LAWS OF THE KNOWABLE.
(2.) THE PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY. Vol. I. .

I. THE DATA OF BIOLOGY.
II. THE INDUCTIONS OF BIOLOGY.

III. THE EVOLUTION OF LIFE.
(8.) THE PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY. Vol. II.

IV. MORPHOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT.

V. PHYSIOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT,

VI, LAWS OF MULTIPLICATION.
(4.) THE PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOLOGY. Vol. I. .

1. THE DATA OF PSYCHOLOGY,
II. THE INDUCTIONS OF PSYCHOLOGY.
III. GENERAL SYNTHESIS,
IV. SPECIAL SYNTHESIS.

V. PHYSICAL SYNTHESIS.
(5.) THE PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOLOGY. Vol. II.

VI. SPECIAL ANALYSTB.
VII. GENERAL ANALYSIS.

VIII. COBOLLARIES.
(6) PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY. Vol. I. .

I. THE DATA OF SOCIOLOGY.
II. THE INDUCTIONS OF SOCIOLOGY,

III. THE DOMESTIC RELATIONS.
(7.) PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY. Vol. II.

IV. CEREMONIAL INSTITUTIONS.

V. POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS. (8.) PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY. Vol. III.

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SOCIAL STATICS;

OR,

THE CONDITIONS

ESSENTIAL TO

HUMAN HAPPINESS

SPECIFIED,

AND THE FIRST OF THEM DEVELOPED.

BY

HERBERT SPENCER,

AUTHOR O

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ILLUSTRATIONS OF PROGRESS," ESSAYS: MORAL, POLITICAL AND EHTIISIDA
“EDUCATION,"
;" * FIRST PRINCIPLES,

PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY,"
PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOLOGY," Erg,

WITH A NOTICE OF THE AUTIOR.

NEW YORK:
D. APPLETON AND COMPANY,
1, 3, AND 5 BOND STREET.

1890.

Intered, according to Act of Congrese, in the year 1865, oy

D. APPLETON & COMPANY,
in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the

Southern District of New York,

INTRODUCTORY NOTICE.

MR. IIERBERT SPENCER was born in Derby, England, where his father and mother still live. For two generations the occupation of his family has been that of teaching-his grandfather having kept the chief school in Derby (after the grammar school), and his father having adopted the same profession.

Herbert was the only surviving child, and his health was so delicate that his parents had but little hope of raising him. His father, who had paid much attention to the subject of physical development, gave such a direction to his child's early education as was suited to the feebleness of his constitution. He brought him up as much as possible in the open air, and sought, by gradual and judicious exercise, to strengthen his muscles and invigorate his constitution. Feeling the danger of exposing him to the usual course of education, he kept him from school, and attended to his instruction chiefly himself.

A correspondent of the Independent who knew the family in Derby several years ago, and who derived from Mr. Spencer's father several particulars of the mode of conducting his son's cul. ture, remarks that his method was to begin with the explanation of the properties and laws of external objects. He never gave him

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