Social Statics: Or, The Conditions Essential to Human Happiness Specified, and the First of Them Developed

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D. Appleton, 1890 - 523 pages

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Page 190 - has freedom to do all that he wills, provided he infringes not the equal freedom of any other...
Page 107 - A state also of equality, wherein all the power and jurisdiction is reciprocal, no one having more than another; there being nothing more evident than that creatures of the same species and rank, promiscuously born to all the same advantages of nature, and the use of the same faculties, should also be equal one amongst another without subordination or subjection...
Page 143 - The labour of his body and the work of his hands we may say are properly his. Whatsoever, then, he removes out of the state that nature hath provided and left it in, he hath mixed his labour with, and joined to it something that is his own, and thereby makes it his property.
Page 240 - State, and each and every of them who shall at any time hereafter be found in any part of this State, shall be and are hereby adjudged and declared guilty of felony, and shall suffer death as in cases of felony without benefit of clergy.
Page 143 - Though the earth and all inferior creatures be common to all men, yet every man has a property in his own person. This nobody has any right to but himself. The labour of his body, and the work of his hands, we may say, are properly his.
Page 73 - Thus the ultimate development of the ideal man is logically certain .... as certain as any conclusion in which we place the most implicit faith for instance, that all men will die.
Page 391 - ... and conquer, by all fitting ways, enterprises and means whatsoever, all and every such person or persons as shall at any time hereafter...
Page 125 - Every man has freedom to do all that he wills, provided he infringes not the equal freedom of any other man...
Page 413 - If they are sufficiently complete to live, they do live, and it is well they should live. If they are not sufficiently complete to live, they die, and it is best they should die.
Page 396 - ... our trade with all parts of the world, for imposing taxes on us without our consent, for depriving us of the...

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