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PROTESTANTS (the) apologie for the

Roman Chvrch. Deuided into three seuerall tractes. Whereof the first concerneth the antiquity & continuance of the Roman Church & religion, euer since the Apostles times. The second 1. That the Protestants religion was not so much as in being, at, or before Luthers first appearing. 2. That the marks of the true Church are apperteyning to the Roman, and wholy wanting to the seuerall Churches, begun by Luther & Caluin. The third That Catholicks are no less loyall and dutifull to their soveraigne, than Protestants. All which is vndertaken, & proued by testimonies of the learned Protestants themselues. VVith a conclusion to the reuerend iudges, and other the graue and learned sages of the law. By Iohn Brereley priest. [James ANDERTON.]

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PROTESTERS no subverters, and Presbyterie no Papacie; or, a vindication of the protesting brethren, and of the government of the Kirk of Scotland, from the aspersions unjustly cast upon them, in a late pamphlet of some of the Resolution party, entituled, A declaration, &c. With a discovery of the insufficiency, inequality and iniquity of the things propounded in that pamphlet, as overtures of union and peace. Especially, of the iniquity of that absolute and unlimited submission to the sentences of Church-judicatories that is holden forth therein, and most unjustly pleaded to belong to the being and essence of Presbyterial government. By some witnesses to the way of the Protestation. [By James GUTHRIE.]

Edinburgh, printed Anno Domini, 1658. Octavo. Pp. I2O.”

“This tract, understood to be written by Mr James Guthrie was answered by Mr George Hutcheson, Mr James Wood, and other Resolutioners in “A review & examination of a pamphlet, bearing the title of Protesters no subverters &c. The answer extends to 139 pages 4to, printed at Edin. 1659. It was revised by the Presbytery of Edinburgh, and published by their appointment.”—MS. note by Dr David Laing.

PROTEUS redivivus: or the art of wheedling, or insinuation, obtain’d by general conversation, and extracted from the several humours, inclinations, and passions of both sexes, respecting their several ages, and suiting each profession or occupation. Collected and methodized by the author of the First part of the English rogue. [Richard HEAD?]

London, 1675. Octavo. Title and epistle 8 leaves, Pp. 352." The initials R. H. are appended to the author's Epistle and apology to his ingenious friend N. W. Esq.

“According to the promise made in my post-script to the first part of the English rogue, I purposed to have finisht that book in a second part, travelling him through the gentiler parts of Europe, topographically discribing all places of eminency, with an account of what tricks and rogueries he committed where ever he came ; but the cudgels were snatcht out of my hands before I had fairly laid them down, I intending to have had but one more bout at the same weapons, and so have compleated the Rogue, but seeing the continuator hath allready added three parts to the former, and never (as far as I can see) will make an end of pestering the world with more volumes and large editions, I diverted my intention into this subject, the Art of wheedling, or insinuation, wherein, I have been at no small pains in the method and contexture: what I have collected hath been out of the choicest French and English authours, not so much as casting an eye upon any copy of the aforesaid continuator, that might any ways assist me in this composure. I would willingly do him any prejudice, though I have been injur’d, and abused by him, and his instigating others, yet his unkindness I repay with respect, and would not be indebted to him for that character he gave me in the second part of the Rogue, but that I fear I should wrong his reputation by ill-wording his encomium; wherefore I shall be silent and refer you to his Unlucky citizen, and books of knight-errantry, &c., which lowdly speak his panagyrick.” Epistle prefixed to Proteus redivivus, from which it appears that Lowndes is mistaken in assigning the second part of the Eng

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PRVDENTIALL (the) ballance of religion, wherein the Catholike and Protestant religion are weighed together with the weights of prudence, and right reason. The first part, in which the foresaide religions are weighed together with the weights of prudence and right reason accordinge to their first founders in our Englishe nation, S. Austin and Mar. Luther. And the Catholike religion euidently deduced through all our kings and archbishopps of Canterburie from S. Austin to our time and the valour and virtue of our kings, and the great learninge and sanctitie of our archbishopps, together with diuers saints and miracles which in their times proued the Catholike faith ; so sett downe as it may seeme also an abridgment of our ecclesiasticall histories. With a table of the bookes and chapters conteyned in this volume. [By Richard SMITH, Bishop of Chalcedon.]

N. P. Printed with licence. 1609. Pp. 46. b. t. 598.”

PRYMER (a) for the laity, set forth after the antient Prymers of Salisbury use, containing the Hours of the Holy Name, and of Our Lady, the Golden Litany, the XV. O's and divers other devout prayers and goodly orisons. [Edited by Athelstan RILEY.] Oxford : 1878. Duodecimo. Pp. 204." [F. Madan.] Preface signed A. R., Pembroke College, Oxford. PRYMER (a) in Englyshe, with certeyn rayers and godly meditations. Translated by George JOY.]

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