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PERCY (the) Anecdotes, original and select. By Sholto [Joseph Clinton RoBERTSON] and Rueben [Thomas BYERLEY] Percy, Brothers of the Benedictine Monastery, Mont Benger.

London: 1823. Duodecimo. 44 parts.

“The Percy Anecdotes, published in fortyfour parts, in as many months, commencing in 1820, were compiled by ‘Sholto and Reuben Percy, Brothers of the Benedictine Monastery of Mont Benger.’ So said the title pages, but the names and the locality were supposé. Reuben Percy was Mr Thomas Byerley, who died in 1824; he was the brother of Sir John Byerley, and the first editor of the Mirror commenced by John Limbird in 1822. Sholto Percy was Mr Joseph Clinton Robertson, who died in 1852; he was the projector of the Mechanics’ Magazine, which he edited from its commencement to his death. The name of the Collection was not taken from the popularity of the Percy Reliques, but from the Percy Coffee House in Rathbone Place, where Byerley and Robertson were accustomed to meet to talk over their joint work. The idea was, however, claimed by my clever master and friend, Sir Richard Phillips, who stoutly maintained that it originated in a suggestion made by him to Dr Tilloch and Mr Mayne to cut the Anecdotes from the many years' files of the Star newspaper, of which Dr Tilloch was then the editor, and Mr Byerley, assistant editor; and to the latter over-hearing the suggestion, Sir Richard contested, might the Percy Anecdotes be traced. I have not the means of ascertaining whether Sir Richard's claim is correct; and I should be equally sorry to reflect upon his statement, as upon that of Mr Byerley, my predecessor in the editorship of the Mirror. The Percy Anecdotes were among the best compilations of their day: their publisher, Mr Thomas Boys of Ludgate Hill, realised a large sum by the work; and no inconsiderable portion of their success must be referred to Mr Boys’ excellent taste in their production : the portrait illustrations, mostly engraved by Try, were admirable.”—John Timbs. AV. and Q., Feb. 1853, p. 214.]

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London: 1705. Quarto. 2 leaves and pp. 23. [Zee's Defoe, 66.]

PERSECUTION impeached, as a tray

tor against God, his laws and government; and the cause of the antient martyrs vindicated, against the cruelty inflicted upon them by the Papists in former dayes. Being a brief answer to a book, called Semper Iidem; or, A parallel of phanaticks, &c. lately published by a nameless author. Wherein is contained a relation of the martyrdom of many such as dissented from, and opposed the Church of Rome; who are in the said book villified and reproached, by the name and term of antient phanaticks. And this is sent forth as an answer thereunto, to pursue it, apprehend it, and condemn it, as a pamphlet of calumnies and slanders against the Protestants, both of former and present dayes; who are all of them scorned in the said book,the one as antient, and the other as modern phanaticks. Which is sent abroad as a warning to England, to beware of the spirit of the Church of Rome, lest it exalt it self in cruel persecution against the Protestants, and all that differ from it; Elidad Baanah. Published for

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account of the inhabitants and customs of the regions east of Kensington. By an inside passenger. To which is appended, a model for a magazine, being the product of the author's sojourn at the village of Barnes during five rainy days. [By William JERDAN.] London: 1829. Duodecimo.” [M. and Q., 15 Mov. 1862.]

PERSONAL (a) narrative of a journey through Norway, part of Sweden, and the islands and states of Denmark. By Derwent Conway, author of “Solitary walks through many lands.” [Henry David INGLIS.]

Edinburgh: 1829. Duodecimo." [Gent.
Mag., Sep. 1835, p. 325.]
Constable's Miscellany, Vol. xxxviii.

PERSONAL nobility: or, letters to a young nobleman, on the conduct of his studies, and the dignity of the peerage. [By Vicesimus KNóx, D.D.] London; MDCCXCIII. Octavo. Pp. xxxv. 363." [Gent. Mag., Sep. 1821, p. 279.]

PERSONAL recollections. By Charlotte Elizabeth. [Charlotte Elizabeth ToNNA.] London. MDCCCXLI. Duodecimo. Pp. vii. 367.”

PERSUASIVE (a) to frequent communion in the holy sacrament of the Lord's Supper... [By John TILLOTson, D.D.] The third edition.

London, 1685. Quarto. Pp. 33. b. t.”

PERSUASIVE (a) to the enlargement of psalmody: or, attempt to shew the reasonableness and obligation of joining, with the Psalms of David, other Scriptural songs, especially out of the New Testament. By a minister of the Church of Scotland. [Robert FINDLAY, D.D.] Glasgow : M DCCLXIII. Octavo." [Ada. Lib.]

PERSWASIVE (a) to a mutuall compliance under the present government. Together with a plea for a free state compared with monarchy. [By Francis Osborn.] Oxford, 1652. Quarto. Pp. 3. b. t. 41." [Bodl.] “This book was writt by Fran. Osbourne y” author of yo Advice to a son.”—MS. note in the hand-writing of Wood.

PERSWASIVE (a) to an ingenuous tryal of opinions in religion. [By

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