Character Development and Storytelling for Games, Second Edition

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Cengage Learning, 2014 - 544 pages
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Written by a professional game writers who also teaches his craft, Lee Sheldon combines his experience and expertise in this updated edition of CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT AND STORYTELLING FOR GAMES. New examples, new game types, and new challenges throughout the text highlight the fundamental importance of characters and storytelling in every type of game. Sheldon emphasizes the importance of creative instinct and listening to the inner voice that guides successful game designers and writers. Join him on his quest to instruct, inform, and maybe even inspire your next great game.
 

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Contents

Introduction
BACKGROUND
CREATING CHARACTERS
Character Encounters PART III TELLING THESTORY Chapter7Once UponaTime Chapter 8Respecting Story Chapter 9 Bringing the Story to Life
The Roots of a New Storytelling
Story Anatomy
Editing
PART IVGAMES PEOPLEPLAY TODAY
Index

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About the author (2014)

Lee Sheldon is Associate Professor and Co-Director of the Games and Simulation Arts and Sciences program at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He has written and designed more than two dozen commercial and applied video games and MMOs. His most recent book from Course Technology PTR is The Multiplayer Classroom: Designing Coursework as a Game. Lee began his academic career at Indiana University, where he instituted the practice of designing classes as multiplayer games, and wrote and designed the alternate reality games in the Skeleton Chase series. Most recently, Lee was lead writer/designer on three games based on Agatha Christie novels, lead writer on Star Trek: Infinite Space, and lead writer on Zynga's Facebook game Indiana Jones Adventure World and an upcoming Kinect game for Harmonix. He is head of the team that is building the Emergent Reality Lab at Rensselaer, a mixed reality space for research and education; lead writer and design consultant on a game teaching math; and lead writer/designer of games teaching Chinese and business ethics. Before his career in video games, Lee wrote and produced over 200 popular television shows, including Star Trek: The Next Generation and Charlie's Angels.

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