The Lake Regions of Central Africa: A Picture of Exploration, Volume 1

Front Cover
Harper, 1860 - 572 pages
This book contains a detailed description of a personal adventure into the Central African Lake Regions. The volume is a combination of an expoistion of popular and picturesque points of views and a geography and ethnology of the area.
 

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Contents

I
21
II
38
III
48
IV
84
V
100
VI
123
VII
164
VIII
174
XI
257
XII
280
XIII
302
XIV
330
XV
365
XVI
378
XVII
423
XVIII
461

IX
206
X
218
XIX
489
XX
523

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Page 268 - The sepoys came to Clive, not to complain of their scanty fare, but to propose that all the grain should be given to the Europeans, who required more nourishment than the natives of Asia. The thin gruel, they said, which was strained away from the rice, would suffice for themselves. History contains no more touching instance of military fidelity, or of the influence of a commanding mind.
Page 409 - I no longer felt any doubt that the lake at my feet gave birth to that interesting river, the source of which has been the subject of so much speculation, and the object of so many explorers.
Page 335 - A pleasing land of drowsy-head it was, Of dreams that wave before the half-shut eye ; And of gay castles in the clouds that pass, For ever flushing round a summer sky...
Page 493 - Men fear death as children fear to go in the dark : and as that natural fear in children is increased with tales, so is the other. Certainly, the contemplation of death, as the wages of sin and passage to another world, is holy and religious ; but the fear of it, as a tribute due unto nature, is weak. Yet in religious meditations there is sometimes mixture of vanity and of superstition. You shall read in some of the friars...
Page 410 - I have no other but a woman's reason ; I think him so, because I think him so.
Page 285 - ... in the pasture-lands frequent herds of many-colored cattle, plump, roundbarrelled, and high-humped, like the Indian breeds, and mingled flocks of goats and sheep dispersed over the landscape, suggest ideas of barbarous comfort and plenty.
Page 307 - I am of opinion,' quoth Bombay, 'that that is the water.' I gazed in dismay; the remains of my blindness, the veil of trees, and a broad ray of sunshine illuminating but one reach of the Lake, had shrunk its fair proportions. Somewhat prematurely I began to lament my folly in having risked life and lost health for so poor a prize, to curse Arab exaggeration, and to propose an immediate return, with the view of exploring the Nyanza or Northern Lake.
Page 415 - The Nyanza is an elevated basin or reservoir, the recipient of the surplus monsoon-rain which falls in the extensive regions of the Wamasai and their kinsmen to the east, the Karagwah line of the Lunar Mountains to the west, and to the south Usukuma or Northern Unyamwezi. Extending to the equator in the central length of the African peninsula, and elevated above the limits of the depression in the heart of the continent, it appears to be a gap in the irregular chain which, running from Usumbara and...

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