The Freemasons' Quarterly Review, and General Assurance Advocate

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Sherwood, Gilbert, and Piper, Paternoster-Row, 1848

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Page 111 - If a man say, I love God, and hateth his brother, he is a liar : for he that loveth not his brother whom he hath seen, how can he love God Whom he hath not seen ? And this commandment have we from Him, that he who loveth God love his brother also.
Page 241 - Who knows whether the best of men be known, or whether there be not more remarkable persons forgot, than any that stand remembered in the known account of time...
Page 213 - You admit that it is not in the power of any man or body of men to make innovations in the body of Masonry.
Page 241 - To be ignorant of evils to come, and forgetful of evils past, is a merciful provision in nature, whereby we digest the mixture of our few and evil days, and, our delivered senses not relapsing into cutting remembrances, our sorows are not kept raw by the edge of repetitions.
Page 127 - See skulking Truth to her old Cavern fled, Mountains of Casuistry heap'd o'er her head! Philosophy, that lean'd on Heav'n before, Shrinks to her second cause, and is no more. Physic of Metaphysic begs defence, And Metaphysic calls for aid on Sense ! See Mystery to Mathematics fly ! In vain ! they gaze, turn giddy, rave, and die.
Page 138 - But when it is sown, it groweth up, and becometh greater than all herbs, and shooteth out great branches; so that the fowls of the air may lodge under the shadow of it.
Page 242 - ... selves, make accumulation of glory unto their last durations. Others, rather than be lost in the uncomfortable night of nothing...
Page 263 - To them his heart, his love, his griefs were given, But all his serious thoughts had rest in heaven. As some tall cliff that lifts its awful form, Swells from the vale, and midway leaves the storm, Though round its breast the rolling clouds are spread, Eternal sunshine settles on its head.
Page 241 - ... one moment. And since death must be the Lucina of life, and even Pagans could doubt whether thus to live were to die ; since our longest sun sets at right descensions, and makes but winter arches, and therefore it cannot be long before we lie down in darkness, and have our light in ashes ; since the brother of death daily haunts us with dying mementos, and time that grows old in itself, bids us hope no long duration ; diuturnity is a dream and folly of expectation.
Page 357 - The cloud-capt towers, the gorgeous palaces, The solemn temples, the great globe itself; * Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve, And, like the baseless fabric of a vision, Leave not a wreck behind.

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