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OP A

TOUR TO THE LAKES,

OP THE CHARACTER AND CUSTOMS OF THE

CEIPPEWAY INDIANS,

AND OF INCIDENTS CONNECTED WITH

THE TREATY OF FOND DU LAC.

BY THOMAS L. McKENNEY,

OF THE INDIAN DEPARTMENT,
And joint Commissioner with his Excellency Gov. Cass, in negotiating the Treaty.

ALSO,

A Vocabulary

OP THE

ALGIC, OR CHIPPEWAY LANGUAGE,

FORMED IN PART, AND AS FAR AS IT GOES, UPON THE BASIS OF ONE FURNISHED

BY THE HON. ALBERT GALLATIN.

“Thus fare the shiv'ring natives of the north,
And thus the rangers of the western world.”..... Cowper,

ORNAMENTED WITH TWENTY-NINE ENGRAVINGS, OF LAKE SUPERIOR, AND OTHER

SCENERY, INDIAN LIKENESSES, COSTUMES, &c.

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DISTRICT OF MARYLAND, TO WIT:

BE IT REMEMBERED, That on this eighteenth day of April, in the fifty-first year of the Independence of the United States of America, Fielding Lucas, Jun'r, of the said District, hah deposited in this office the title of a book, the right wbereof' he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit:

Sketches of a " our to the Lakes, of the Character and Customs of the Chippeway Indians, and o incidents connected with the Treaty of Fond Du Lac. By Thomas L. McKenney, of the Indian Department, and joint Commissioner with his Excellency Gov. Cass, in negotiating the Treaty. Also, a Vocabulary of the Algic, or Chippeway Language, formed in part, and as far as it goes, upon the basis of one furnished by the Hon. Albert Gallatin.

*Thus fare the shiv'ring natives of the north,

And thus the rangers of the western world.'....Cowper.
Ornamented with twenty-nine engravings, of Lake Superior, and other scenery, Indian
Likenesses, Costumes, &c.”

In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States, entitled "An Act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned;" and also to the Act, entitled An Act supplementary to the Act, entitled an Act for the encouragement of learn ing, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts. and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein menrioned, and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving, and etching historical and other prints."

PHILIP MOORE,
Clerk of the District of Maryland.

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TO THE

HONOURABLE JAMES BARBOUR,

SECRETARY OF WAR.

DEAR SIR,

The high opinion I entertain of your worth as a Citizen, and Patriot, and as a public functionary, would authorize an expression of it, upon all proper occasions-but when to this is superadded the obligation under which I am laid, not only by the temporary absence which, in a season of indisposition, you so kindly granted me from the public duties of my office, but in joining me in a commission of importance, and with a distinguished Citizen, with whom it could not be otherwise than a pleasure to be associated, I feel anxious to testify this obligation by some acknowledgment of it, and in a manner the least exceptionable to yourself.

Having been solicited to publish the gleanings of my Tour, and which I undertook to collect, and transmit, from time to time, in compliance with the request of a friend, I have yielded, chiefly for the sake of the opportunity which the occasion furnishes for a gratification of my feelings, by inscribing them to you. However little there is in the work to recommend it to your approbation, either of the graces of literary composition, or of the more solid materials of scientific research, I trust it will be received in testimony of the very great respect, and gratitude, with which I have the honour to be, your Obliged and obedient servant,

THOS. L. McKENNEY.

TO THE READER.

I have no apology to offer for the numerous imperfections of this work. I have consented to its publication, and have thus, impliedly at least, admitted, that in my own opinion, full of blemishes as I may esteem it to be, there will remain enough, after these shall have been overlooked, to make it not altogether unworthy of a perusal. It is, however, but justice to state, that I left home without the most remote intention of offering to the public the scraps which I might pick up by the way; and therefore made no preparations, either in books, or tests, or instruments.- I promised in compliance with the request of a friend, and which was made in the night preceding the morning on which I set out, to do, and in a certain way, just what I have accomplished, and just so, and in precisely the order, in which this promise was fulfilled, will the reader find it in this volume.

I am aware that the form might have been changed, and the plan re-modelled; and that in the process the weeds might have been left out, and the flowers, if any, retained. But for such a task I have neither the leisure, nor the inclination. The reader will, therefore, have to follow me,-if he follow at all-in the first track, crooked and uninteresting as it may be; and the only consolation I can offer him is, that when he may arrive at a green spot, or pleasant place,

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