Some Account of the Life, Writings, and Speeches of William Pinkney

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Collins & Company, 1826 - 616 pages
 

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Page 2 - an Act, supplementary to an act) entitled an Act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the Copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned...
Page 181 - ... the high roads are broken up and the waters out, when a new and troubled scene is opened, and the file affords no precedent, then it is that a greater knowledge of mankind, and a far more extensive comprehension of things is requisite, than ever office gave, or than office can ever give.
Page 2 - District, has deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit : " THE CHILD'S BOTANY," In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States, entitled, " An act for the encouragement of learning by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned...
Page 458 - We shall have neutrality, soft and gentle and defenceless in herself, yet clad in the panoply of her warlike neighbors; with the frown of defiance upon her brow, and the smile of conciliation upon her lip ; with the spear of Achilles in one hand, and a lying protestation of innocence and helplessness unfolded in the other. Nay, if I may be allowed so bold a figure, in a mere legal discussion, we shall have the branch of olive entwined around the bolt of Jove, and neutrality in the act of hurling...
Page 594 - But let us proceed to take a rapid glance at the reasons which have been assigned for this notion that involuntary servitude and a republican form of government are perfect antipathies. The gentleman from New Hampshire* has defined a republican government to be that in which all the men participate in its power and privileges: from whence it follows that where there are slaves, it can have no existence.
Page 571 - West, this obscure foundling of a wilderness that was but yesterday the hunting ground of the savage, is to find her way into the American family as she can, with an humiliating badge of remediless inferiority patched upon her garments, with the mark of recent, qualified manumission upon her, or rather with a brand upon her forehead to tell the story of her territorial vassalage, and to perpetuate the memory of her evil propensities. It is now avowed that, while the robust district of Maine is to...
Page 591 - How is the Union formed? By equal contributions of power. Make one member sacrifice more than another, and it becomes unequal. The compact is of two parts : 1. The thing obtained federal rights. 2. The price paid local sovereignty. You may disturb the balance of the Union, either by diminishing the thing acquired, or increasing the sacrifice paid.
Page 575 - ... as effectually as with this. Slavery, we are further told, with some pomp of metaphor, is a canker at the root of all that is excellent in this republican empire, a pestilent disease that is snatching the youthful bloom from its cheek, prostrating its honor and withering its strength. Be it so yet if you have power to medicine to it in the way proposed, and in virtue of the diploma which you claim, you...
Page 598 - ... qualifications are just as much disfranchised, with regard to the government and its power, as if they were slaves. They have civil rights indeed (and so have slaves in a less degree ; ) but they have no share in the government. Their province is to obey the laws, not to assist in making them. All such States must therefore be forisfamiliated with Virginia and the rest, or change their system : For the constitution being absolutely silent on those subjects, will afford them no protection. The...
Page 582 - I shall have a more suitable occasion to speak on this topic hereafter, when I come to consider the treaty which ceded Louisiana to the United States. But I will say a few words upon it now, of a more general application than it will in that branch of the argument be necessary to use. A territory cannot surrender to congress, by anticipation, the whole, or a part of the sovereign power, which, by the constitution of the Union, will belong to it when it becomes a state and a member of the Union. Its...

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